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    Travis Stearns: Flyers

Graphic Design

Travis Stearns' events flyers are some of the best in town (not our town sadly)

Posted by James Cartwright,

We all love a good night out (actually some of us like to be tucked up in bed by 10pm, but we don’t like to talk about that) and we love a well-designed flyer. So often the pieces of paper foisted upon us as we loiter outside the pub on a Friday night are so woefully tedious that you have to wonder how on earth those responsible hope to fill a venue.

Thankfully residents of Minneapolis can avoid our promotional anguish because resident to their lovely city is Travis Stearns, graphic designer extraordinaire and creator of some of the liveliest promo flyers we’ve laid eyes on. Travis treats each event flyer as a visual experiment, allowing his imagination to run riot with imagery and type that begs to be engaged with, making you powerless against the event in question. If Travis did nights in London we’d be less inclined to hit the sack with a good novel quite so regularly. Maybe.

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Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

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