Illustration Archive

  1. Simon-roussin-film-projects-int-list

    In the three years since we last posted Simon Roussin’s work it appears the French cartoonist has become something of a cinephile. A huge amount of his illustrated output now comes in the form of homages to classics of the medium, including obsessive screen-printed books about the late, great Steve McQueen, Gerard Depardieu’s best bits and some of Clint Eastwood’s most brutal showdowns. Of course it goes without saying that his drawing goes from strength to strength. What’s wonderful about Simon’s film obsession is his ability to balance an addiction to the silver screen and a prolific illustration career, something my mum once told me was impossible.

  2. Mariohugo-recentlyrejected-int-list

    There was an interesting discussion on our podcast recently about why anyone would really want to watch the creative process taking place. Off the back of our visit to see what was essentially P J Harvey in a box, we’ve spent a lot of time chatting about how the creative process is slow and messy and frustrating, littered with wrong turns and dead-ends.

  3. Bethwalrond-chint-int-list

    Despite only having graduated from Falmouth University last summer illustrator Beth Walrond already has an admirable portfolio of work to show for herself. This is probably due to the warmth and relatable nature of her style – she builds textural, expressive characters out of geometric shapes and soft lines to create identifiable narratives, condensing complex messages down into sweet, two-dimensional form. Now working out of Berlin, her newest projects include work for Hunger Magazine, The Ride Journal, Wired UK and The Debrief, leading us to believe she’s got a hell of a lot more ideas to get down on paper yet.

  4. Collectionrevue-gif

    What could be better than six cool pals getting together to make a whopper of a comic book? Meet Collection Revue, a French sextet formed in 2010 and made up of Sammy Stein, Vanessa Dziuba, Marine Le Saout, Antoine Stevenot, Jean-Philippe Bretin and Julien Kedryna. For a year they spent their time and money putting on a bunch of small shows in Paris, exhibiting the work of cartoonists, visual and graphic artists and illustrators to what I can only imagine is a very cool and good-looking crowd. They now channel their collective obsession into very, very appealing publications.

  5. Newyorker-90th-int-list

    Here’s a piece of useless trivia you never thought you needed; what is the name of the monocle-wearing dandy who appeared on the first ever cover of The New Yorker and has gone on to become its mascot? The answer is Eustace Tilley, and for many years the magazine published his image almost unchanged when its birthday rolled around at the end of February.

  6. Louis-granet-fort-worth-int-list

    I’m fast falling in love with the work of Parisian illustrator and artist Louis Granet. The student of the Haute Ecole des arts du Rhin produces comics the likes of which I’ve never seen. His drawing style is unique in its use of unnerving perspective, frantic, angular line work and the childlike application of colour – plus his comics feature empty speech bubbles that offer no clue as to the story within each panel. Granted, that sounds like quite a confusing combination, but Louis’ work is full of drama, suspense and, in spite of its nebulous nature, tangible narratives.

  7. Sarah_lippett_listelizabeth_int_1

    From Sarah Lippett, the lady who brought us the wonderful Stan – a comic book tale of her grandfather pieced together from others’ memories – comes the equally wonderful Living Here. The project is the result of Sarah spending a month living in the Cliftonville area of Margate, where she spoke to residents about their lives, their town and the changes they’ve seen there, before immortalising them in illustrated narrative panels.

  8. List

    Dan Stafford where have you been all my life? Just round the corner in east London probably, making your beautiful work and keeping yourself to yourself. But I wish I’d found you sooner; I’d have pestered you endlessly to draw me things for the magazine, or draw things for my own personal collection. We’d have talked over briefs, joked about your early sketches for the commission and then fist-bumped over that final Photoshop file. We could have been great together Dan Stafford. Hopefully we still can!

  9. Siggi-list

    “The older I get, the more interested I become in form and beauty. Siggi Eggertsson’s new screensaver is filling some of that need in design.” As testimonials go this is pretty special, even more so when you consider it comes from Stefan Sagmeister, who knows a thing or two about visual brilliance. Saver Screensson is a screensaver for Mac OS X by Siggi and developer Hjalti Jakobsson, which “creates unique patterns on your display by randomly stacking vector stencils to create a virtually infinite, but aesthetically consistent set of possible outcomes.”

  10. Yoko-honda-int-list

    Although it’s a source of inspiration for a number of different creative types, Yoko Honda’s artwork channels the aesthetics of the 1980s more so than anyone else I’ve come across. Her digital paintings pay homage to the garish and the gaudy, channeling an era of affluence and excess. The self-taught artist hails from Tokyo but takes inspiration from the USA. “When anyone expresses the 80s,” she says, “there’s that element of Miami and California – you could say they’re the places that symbolise the 80s best (the place of the dream).”

  11. Ryotakemasa-int-list

    We in the studio are the first to admit that if you slap a foreign script onto something it instantly becomes approximately 200% more exciting from a design point of view. In the case of Ryo Takemasa, however, the text is kind of just the cherry on the cake. Editorial illustration for newspaper and magazine covers is his bread and butter – so much so that his portfolio site looks something like the wall of a Japanese newsagents – but with his soft style and witty observations about urban life it’s little wonder he’s stacking up commissions. Based in Tokyo, Ryo works across books, magazines and advertising, producing imagery which looks born for covers but here’s a selection of proof, if any was needed, that his work speaks for itself too.

  12. Malikafavre-baftas-int-list

    Last night us Brits got all razzed up about the BAFTAs, the annual UK precursor to the Oscars hosted by bona fide national treasure Stephen Fry which always exhibits a charming bias to homegrown films. This year Human After All worked with Malika Favre, one of our favourite illustrators, to create the poster for the event and five different covers for the brochure representing the Best Film nominees (Birdman, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Boyhood, The Theory of Everything and The Imitation Game).

  13. Lazybones-blog-2-int_copy

    Sydney-based Miranda Lorikeet, or Lazybones, is an HR assistant by day, taking spare moments, evenings and weekends to produce gradient and island filled drawings on MS Paint. Using pictures of sunsets for colour reference, and taking a day per image – working for hours to get the mountain ridges and gradients just right, Miranda is crazy prolific. Her work has something of the “outsider” about it: it’s intuitive and strays only from seascapes, cliffs and rocky mountains to depict butts and sunglasses.

  14. Waiwaipang-main2-int

    Is there something in the water at Brighton? Everyone from the Graphic Design and Illustration course seems to leave with a confident streak of joy and happiness, and humour that you just don’t get from a lot of other students. Classic example here in Wai Wai Peng, a 2013 graduate who soaks up all the positive vibes in the world and sneezes them out as cute (but not too cute) pencil and ink drawings. Simple though some of her drawings seem, a closer inspection of abstract pieces such as Drift and the intelligence and skill of Lamenting the end of Olympic speed skating action suggest true draughtsmanship. I just love it. Jeez I could look at them all day. Maybe I will. See you in a bit.

  15. Gracewilson-list-nt

    These days Twitter allows everybody, from your great uncle George to an alien who’s still getting his head around language share their opinions about contemporary culture. The trouble with this, of course, is that not everybody has something interesting to say, which makes finding new ways of participating in this discussion a challenge in itself. 

  16. Brechtvandenbroucke-the-fame-main-int

    Brecht, after five years of admiring your work I can happily say that I can spell your name without looking. And I can tell you that even though I’ve spent years admiring the skill of your painting, I can finally say that I think I actually get it. Over time, Brecht’s erratic artworks have become increasingly crowded with characters, pop culture references, logos, and his trademark long-limbed creatures.

  17. Janneivonen-imagemagazine-main-int

    Does anyone else still get a rush of excitement when you see someone using an iPhone in a film? I think it was while watching Superbad and you hear Michael Cera’s phone ringing the ubiquitous iPhone Marimba that I thought “Oooh! They’re using the technology that I use!” – because before that I swear every film apart from James Bond used really old fashioned brick phones.

  18. Malachi-ward-int-5

    Californian comics artist Malachi Ward treads a fine line between outlandish superhero fiction and achingly powerful personal tales. The Pasadena resident is always feverishly busy working on new self-initiated stories, or collaborating with Matt Sheehan on drawing and colouring for Image Comics’ Prophet Strikefile series.

  19. Edithcarron-list-2-int

    How’s this for a delightful collection of images? Edith Carron is a French illustrator who has been working out of Berlin for the past seven years, and her portfolio comprises a beguiling combination of fun, socially-conscious and mischievous themes delivered in coloured pencil and print. And it’s fantastic. So much so, in fact, that The New York Times, Zeit Campus Magazin and Suddeutsche Zeitung Magazin are only three from a client list longer than we care to count who have commissioned Edith to make first-rate work, including this wonderful cover for Revue Citrus, depicting two male footballers in a loving embrace before their fans. Edith also generously posts a collection of personal work in her Journal, in which she takes snapshots from everyday life and makes them look like something out of a technicolour children’s book-inspired dream. What a treat.

  20. Martinnicolausson-int-list

    It is almost exactly a year since Swedish illustrator Martin Nicolausson last appeared on the site but if it’s to become an annual tradition to check back in on his work, then you won’t find me complaining. Martin has considerable and versatile talents and particularly excels in editorial work for the likes of Icon, New Humanist and Wallpaper* magazines. But there’s also some charming self-initiated work among his recent updates, including a series dedicated to golf which actually makes this stuffy sport seem pretty darn appealing. His colour palette is often muted but he makes the most of every visual decision to ensure maximum, if sometimes quiet, impact.

  21. Samplerman-list-int

    Yvan Guillo is not an illustrator who is about to be held back by traditional practices. One day while he was sampling the tonal background of vintage comics to create a more retro feel in his own panels, he accidentally selected an area with a character in it, and his crazy new mash-up technique was born. He has continued creating works using these techniques under the pseudonym Samplerman, posting them on a Tumblr of the same name to create an extensive series. Even better, he created the word “procrastinatic” to describe such an activity. Making up formats and adjectives? Who is this enigmatic creator?

  22. Penelope-gazin-int-list

    Weird is a word that’s applied lazily to anything that’s even vaguely out of the ordinary. You start chatting to a stranger on the bus: “Weird!” You have a dream where you’re in your house, and it doesn’t look anything like your house, but all your family live there and you have your own room so it must be your house: “Weird!” You take a new route on the walk home from work for no particular reason at all: “Weird!” None of these things are weird you damn fools. Weird is MUCH more exciting than that.

  23. 1janne-kokkonen-tunica-

    We’re benevolent old things here at It’s Nice That – so much so that illustrator Janne Kokkonen reckoned that being one of our students of the month in 2013 was “one of the nicest things that had happened to me during my studies.”

  24. Margheritaurbani-list-int

    Being huge fans of Andy Rementer’s cheeky work we’ve seen illustrator Margherita Urbani’s name bandied around a lot over the past few years, whether in credits in Apartamento or The New York Times, but it wasn’t until last week that we thought to look up exactly what she does. Which, as it turns out, is quite a lot.

  25. Mattpanuska-barbara-int-list

    In ancient times Matt Panuska would have been some kind of shamanistic guide, plying his wards with ayahuasca and leading them through their subconscious with a gentle hand. Unfortunately he lives in modern-day Brooklyn, where DMT-related healing is positively discouraged, so Matt makes his living drawing images that seem born from an altered mind.

  26. Brandon-celi-cold-storage-int-8

    Covering beer-holding Furbys, flaxen-haired Nickelback chump Chad Kroeger and laptop Scrabble, Toronto-based illustrator Brandon Celi’s subjects are as varied as his work is brilliant. He works in paint to bring to life hilarious scenarios including a reimagining of the Wizard of Oz scene where the wicked witch is crushed by a house, but this time targeting surely the most evil (aesthetically, at least) of all footwear: Crocs.

  27. Christophniemann-sundaysketch-int-list

    Christoph Niemann is one of our creative heroes, an illustrator and artist whose talent, imagination and sense of humour puts him smack bang in the top drawer. So imagine our excitement when we found out he was doing an Ask Me Anything on Reddit yesterday, where he held forth on all manner of topics, from serious illustration insight to his love of butter. Here’s some of the wit and wisdom he shared…

  28. Charlottedelarue-list-3-int

    Illustrator and art director Charlotte Delarue’s varied work shows her to be an uncommonly talented illustrator, conjuring incredibly realistic portraits out of paper and pencil safe in the knowledge that she doesn’t need to do anything more to make them impressive. Her art direction is of another ilk entirely, however – she works with the likes of electro acts Chromeo, Justice and Kavinsky to draw up impactful logotypes and album artwork concepts that can be spotted from miles away, from the golden legs which reappear on almost every Chromeo album cover to Kavinsky’s mysterious blue-tinged scenes.

  29. Majic_riso

    Sophy Hollington has been busy making some sassy new printed matter. With fan art, band T-shirts, record sleeves and commissions from The New York Times and Japanese gallery Parades, Sophy’s detailed, lino-cut and Risograph printed work is gorgeous, varied and often rather strange.

  30. Joedator-self-int

    Interviewing cartoonist Joe Dator is a real honour, because he’s a total hero and also a spectacular interviewee. Listen to him talk about his working life: “Everything revolves around Tuesday. The New Yorker cartoon meeting is on Tuesday, so that’s the day we all submit our new ideas to the editor…I usually work over the weekend and by Monday night I’m in full-on lockdown to get my batch of ideas ready. Wednesday is a day off. If you ever want to socialise with a New Yorker cartoonist, Wednesday is the day to do it.”

  31. Ben_mendelwicz-collage-7-int

    New York-based illustrator Ben Mendelewicz draws comics, illustrates and animates for the likes of Adult Swim, Stussy and Funny or Die. He has contributed to Mouldmap, Happiness and Weird with comic horror stories of white collar jobs with fragmented scripts of bastardised professional jargon.

  32. Robpybus-thenewrepublic

    It’s great to see Rob Pybus’ work again after a little bit of a break. Like many illustrators at the moment, Rob has been unable to resist the allure of GIFs, and has clearly been spending a lot of his time recently turning his marvellous, perspective-skewing illustrations into mini films. Rob’s also been busy working for a whole bunch of exciting new clients such as Wired, The New York Times, Jacobin and Original Source, among others.

  33. Main

    When we were up at Graphic Design Festival Scotland last year we met two nice guys called Dominic Kesterton and Orlando Lloyd who were assisting people in their design dreams by showing them how to make their own riso prints. A fantastic illustrator and designer respectively, Dominic and Orlando started up a small printing press, Workhorse Press, during their time studying in Edinburgh. We wanted to talk to them about why they’re still at it, the difficulties they face, and why Scotland’s print, design and illustration scene would be lost without them. Here they are…

  34. List

    Rand Renfrow is one of the illustrators we came across among the scores of upcoming artists and illustrators publishing with Clay Hickson’s independent project Tan & Loose yesterday, and seeing as how last time we featured him it was in our Introducing feature nearly two years ago, it seemed high time to check in.

  35. List

    Illustrator Graham Roumieu may be one of the most prolific creatives around. Already the 2015 tab on his website is populated with a load of work, less than two weeks into the year. And because it’s been nearly two years since we last featured him on the site, it’s no great surprise that there is a tonne of great imagery for us, and you, to enjoy. Regular clients include The Atlantic, New York Magazine and the Readers’ Questions feature in Popular Mechanics (where he brings to life such public puzzlers as “What do pilots talk about on long-haul flights?").

  36. 20

    “All hail Hickson!” were the words with which we finished our last post about Chicago-based illustrator Clay Hickson back in 2012, and while it doesn’t give us much to improve on, the expression certainly still seems to fit our feelings for him. Since we last checked in, Clay has developed his practice immeasurably, stepping away from pencils to embrace Adobe Illustrator and printmaking all the more enthusiastically, and making a heap of new work in the process. He’s stuck to his old penchant for pop surrealist scenes and funny-shaped girl parts – he loves a boob and a sausage, does Clay – but the calibre of the work has improved in a striking way.

  37. List

    Orson is only 12 years old but has already achieved my unrealised childhood dream of publishing his own graphic novel. Last Saturday saw the launch of his latest title, The Adventures of Hal Dekenzin, at Orbital Comics in London – an event that included not only freshly printed comics, but also a plethora of live drawing by the author himself.

  38. List

    Presenting Matt Chase, the editorial illustrator living and working in Washington DC, who can transform a wishy-washy concept into a solid hunk of imagery with a snap of the fingers. You’ve likely seen his work already without knowing it – maybe in the New York Times, on the cover of one of Douglas Coupland’s novels, or perhaps in the Wall Street Journal if you’re that way inclined.

  39. List

    Giulia Garbin is carving out a very particular niche for herself, as a creator of great-looking tributes to the graphic design days of old. Her graduation project from the Royal College of Art was a stunning book celebrating the last printers in London’s Fleet Street and her new offering is a visual homage to the typographers of Turin.

  40. List

    I come back to Benjamin Marra’s sketchbooks time and again when I feel like real life is just a little too drab. The witty and irreverent comics artist has an insatiable appetite for the surreal and absurd that never fails to get me tittering away like a cheeky schoolboy. Everything from the unusually-proportioned physiques of his protagonists to the bizarre headlines that run across his images serve to delight and entertain, whether that’s the catchily-named Fantomah Meets Madame Satan at a Lesbian Bar in Hell or the wild-eyed warrior LuLu Benedict: Angry Bitch, Vigilante Gangleader. He’s also drawn one of the finest portraits of Beyoncé I’ve ever laid eyes on. Long may his madness continue!