Interactive Archive

  1. Gallery-of-lost-art-lead

    Tate Media has just launched an ultra-absorbing online exhibition entitled The Gallery of Lost Art. It showcases, in great detail, the numerous significant artworks of the past century that have been stolen, destroyed, rejected, or have simply disappeared. The project, which kicked off today, will run for an entire year – with new items being added each week. Curated by the Tate and designed by ISO Design, its interface provides the user with a view of a grey warehouse floor-space, with different ephemera laid out on widely set apart desks, and stenciled typography categorising works by the manner in which it was lost. It features any surviving images of the works under discussion, along with fascinating essays on the circumstances that led to their disappearance.

  2. Applist

    Now don’t judge me here, but there are few phrases that strike as much fear into my heart as “contemporary dance” which conjures up images of intense, wild-eyed lycra bunnies trying to encapsulate “mendacity.” For two hours. With that in mind anything that can pierce the glazed safety mode the phrase induces is clearly doing something special, so three cheers for Pentagram’s Abbott Millet and his new iPad App Fifth Wall for performing arts magazine 2wice.

  3. Lego_lead

    Back in the good old days of yore children whiled away their afternoons in idol play, lost in their imaginations with nothing but bed sheets, twigs and a muddy pit at the back of the house as props for their elaborate role-playing. Kings waged wars, empires fell and everyone had to get cleaned up before tea. Then came Lego and the shape of play changed forever, so much so that those little coloured blocks and weekend afternoons will be linked in my mind forever.

  4. Kapu

    What do you get if you combine the talents of five, young, happy men in one big friendly studio in Helsinki in the very year that it has been awarded the world capital of design? Well, probably quite a lot of things, but these guys have decided to form a collective called Kapu, specialising in creating apps for children. Ah yeah, apps for children – the very words can often make people run for the hills, but that’s kind of why Kapu Forest (their debut game) has been produced. Rather than exposing children to hidden advertising and mind numbing screens, Kapu Forest teaches children about nature whilst exposing them to some 1950s-inspired illustration and a very nice jazz soundtrack. When was the last time you caught flies sitting on a lilypad listening to jazz? hmm? Thought not.

  5. Rainer-kohlberger-detail

    Berlin-based artist and designer Rainer Kohlberger knows a thing or two about digital design. The clean flat colour fields and neatly arranged gridworks on his website attest to his expertise in the area, and with a solid education in multimedia from the University of Applied Sciences in Salzburg, and with teaching stints in algorithmic media creation and audiovisual design, he’s well placed to produce work that is not only technically proficient, but visually and intellectually arresting.

  6. Main

    It was never going to be easy to explain what exactly happened at the current Secret Cinema – purely because we’re not allowed to disclose anything. But after confirming what exactly we can tell you, I’ll do my best to describe the immersive and exciting science-experiment of a dinner that we were invited to, courtesy of Secret Cinema, and in the venue itself.

  7. Rrstill

    We’ve long been fans of Rafael Rozendaal’s digital creations but perhaps our only frustration has been seeing his talents constrained by our computer screens. Well now that’s been addressed – and then some – by an installation in Seoul. Rafael was invited to show four of his works – Much Better Than This, Falling Falling, Like This Forever and Towards Beyond – on the world’s biggest LED screen which measures 100 metres by 80 metres (an installation produced by none other than Calvin Klein).

  8. Okfocus-list

    What does the digital studio love-child of Ryder Internet Archeology Ripps and Jonathan Vingiano look like? OKFocus – a remarkably ingenious portfolio of web wonders and playfully professional design solutions for the most contemporary of internet thinkers.

  9. Moca-land-art-list

    This week saw the opening of Ends of the Earth: Land Art to 1974 at The Geffin Contemporary; the first “historical-thematic” of its kind to deal with Land Art and its exciting emergence in the 1960s. The exhibition is justifiably broad and is being accompanied by a brilliant online catalogue to help contextualise the works by the various and ambitious artists.

  10. Tedlist2

    Prepared to be stopped in your tracks because this is off the hook. James Théophane has just uploaded these incredible videos of a project he did on behalf of Clemenger BBDO Sydney for the city’s recent TEDX event. By rigging the auditorium with microphones he created Mimeisthai, a generative speech recognition trending engine.During the breaks it captured snippets of conversation and fed them into a data visualisation machine which measured differentials like tone, location and intensity, creating an interactive sound cloud that reflects the topics and ideas gaining momentum in the space. Is this a brave new era for social media, saving people the trouble of toiling over 140 characters? Maybe, maybe not but either way it’s fascinating, ambitious and undeniably beautiful. I would suggest watching the making of below before the main event above and there’s some more detail over on James’ blog.

  11. Uslist

    As a precocious show-off of a child I would often try to make my mum laugh by “conducting” along to Classic Fm (NB a cake tester makes an excellent baton). There’s something beguiling about the whole performance of classical music, the drama, the incredible skill and the intensity combine to create something epic, and thanks to a new installation at The Science Museum you can immerse yourself right in the epicentre of an orchestra.

  12. Frmain

    Whether it be flipping a bin upside down (a quick perch) or simply picking up a plastic lid and throwing at at someone (frisbee), Florian Rivière sees the potential in everything our streets have to offer. A self-titled ‘Urban Hacktivist’, Rivière spends his time seeking out overlooked detritus and quickly turning it into something remarkably fun. All of his projects are great, but particular highlights are his car-park football pitches and his revolving advertising carousel for children.

  13. Spapp

    There’s a tendency when you work in a particular industry to resort to an odd sort of hyperbole over certain issues – so almost universally news of Spotify’s new iPad app has been reported in terms of “finally it’s here” as though we were on the verge of civil breakdown unless the general populace’s demands for such an app were sated. Nevertheless it is big news if you a) have an iPad and b)like Spotify in which case you’ll likely be cock-a-hoop at the news.

  14. Rilist

    The obvious challenge in reviewing installation art is the inevitable “you had to be there” issue, relying as it does so much on real-time manipulation (in a non pejorative way). This is especially true of Ryoji Ikeda’s new data.anatomy (civic) piece which opened yesterday in Berlin, combining as it does a massively theatrical setting with a complex piece of video art.

  15. Olo

    OLO is an html5 game developed by digital design studio Sennep and, like all the best, most productivity threatening ways to use your iPad/Pod/Phone, it has easy rules, a simple, engaging design and induces compulsive behaiviour. We love it when a studio pursues personal projects and, as a new version is set to be released, the fun continues with this great little animation.

  16. Clublist

    It’s the kind of brief you might get set at art school – re-design a ubiquitous, well-known product from scratch, enhancing its design and ironing out issues. But Heineken’s Open Design Explorations Project has made that pie-in-the-sky idea a reality, bringing the expertise and resources of a major, multinational, design-obsessed brand to the party.

  17. Maplist

    My favourite thing about the internet is how it facilitates communities coming together around any number of specialist and obscure interests, so that whatever floats your boat you can easily find and connect with like-minded obsessives.

  18. Bm

    Future Cinema (sister company to The Other Cinema) have become well-known for expanding films beyond the screen and bringing them to life through large-scale events, recreating scenes and settings to dizzying effect. They’ve done it again with a 360 degree live cinematic experience of Bugsy Malone that’s currently running in London.

  19. Tv_01

    To celebrate Tate Modern’s ongoing Yayoi Kusama retrospective, creative partnership Hellicar and Lewis created ‘The Hello Cube’, a quietly complex, social media-savvy interactive installation inspired by the great Japanese artist’s work The Passing Winter.

  20. Calcfront

    “Math is beautiful. Arithmetic is simple. Rechner is both.” It may sound like the strapline of a particularly leftfield perfume advert but actually that’s what Colorado-based designers Todd Berger and Lucian Föhr say about their new app which creates the world’s first minimalist gesture-based calculator. Taking the touchscreen iTechnology we’ve all come to know and love, they’ve applied it to one of the world’s most basic products with stylish results. Certain swipes engage different mathematical functions (multiply, divide etc) and both in aesthetics and functionality this appears to be a significant milestone on the road to a time when this technology is ubiquitous.

  21. Dhfronmt

    Yesterday the great and the good of the art world descended on Tate Modern for the press preview of Damien Hirst’s much-anticipated retrospective. The work on show spans more than two decades with many of his greatest hits from pickled sharks to pill bottles and the famous diamond-encrusted skull. Expect po-faced editorials and furious radio phone-ins on the subject, but in terms of dragging conceptualism into the mainstream Hirst’s legacy is hard to quibble with.

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