Photography Archive

  1. Itsnice-that-hero-punchdrunk-and-julian-abrams-publish-new-book-of-photography-of-the-drowned-man4-photo-by-julian-abrams

    As Hollywood stars and wounded lovers flew around me, I found myself strolling around a sandy expanse, playing on a rickety old piano, sipping from a hidden whisky bottle and finally being pushed against a wall as someone whispered “you’re wonderful” into my ear. It’s safe to say a night at a Punchdrunk production is as disorientating as it is thrilling. The theatre company’s The Drowned Man, which ran for a year from 2013, was utterly exhilarating, breathtakingly complex and stunningly beautiful. I’m not entirely sure what happened, but lordy it was impressive. However, the visceral, immersive nature of the whole thing makes it damn hard to convey in two dimensions; though this new photo book of images shot by Julian Abrams comes pretty close. From a steamy tryst to a poignant pair of red shoes, the drama, the emotion and the sense that you can never truly piece together the full story of the production are communicated brilliantly. If it could whisper affirmations into our ears, it’d be just about spot on.

  2. Simon-hogsberg-the-grocery-store-project-itsnicethat-list

    One supermarket, one man, thousands of faces and 2067 images make up Danish photographer Simon Hoegsberg’s The Grocery Store Project. Simon tells us that over a year and a half, he patiently stationed himself atop a bike rail in front of the same Copenhagen supermarket, snapping away as people walked in and out; all the while kissing, pondering, smoking, chatting on the phone or doing any number of things we do without really thinking about it. From the whopping total of 97,000 an edit of 2067 were selected and arranged in a grid. While it may just look like a sort of dingy Tetris or an unhelpful map, on closer inspection you notice that within each sequence, we see the same face – sometimes serene, sometimes flustered, sometimes downright miserable. It feels eerie in its demonstration that while time ticks and our lives fly by, we do the same things, we’re the same person, just popping to the shops.

  3. Karenelson-timwalker-itsnicethat-list

    As It’s Nice That’s resident fashion expert (ahem) I know a strong editorial shoot when I see one, and this one for Vogue’s May edition is as good as they get. In it you’ll see Karen Elson wearing all manner of clothing by various clothes-makers – all of which look stunning. But stuff the outfits, this is all about the locations and the luxurious referencing of south Asian iconography. Tim, Samantha Bryant and Duffy travelled all the way to Bhutan to shoot Karen in the Himalayas alongside a supporting cast of masked imps and Bhutanese locals, weaving a surreal narrative of pagan mysticism and evoking an atmosphere akin to the hippie trail.

  4. Severa-frahm--itsnicethat_lemonde_airport_list

    Apart from the frisking, of course, there’s very little that’s sexy or attractive about going through airport security. There’s certainly little that’s sartorial about padding around in your socks, or in men holding their trousers up as their belts sail through the X-ray machines. Somehow, though, Severa Frahm has managed to turn the situation into one that’s very much sexy, attractive and sartorial, taking it as the starting point for some great fashion editorial shots. The Amsterdam-based studio is comprised of photographer and art director Mirka Laura Severa, while Michael Frahm assists and is responsible for the post-production elements. The airport shots are so smart and serene, making even the big Alsatian dog seem effortlessly chic as he dips his snout into the scanner and over some very expensive luggage. Elsewhere in the Severa Frahm portfolio there’s some great still life work that pops with bright tones and brighter concepts, as well as the old pretty girl in car on sunny day chestnut.

  5. List

    This isn’t our usual type of post; there’s nothing fun, colourful or inherently “nice” about these images, but Jonny Seymour’s shots of an Easter tradition in the Philippines are truly astounding, so apologies if they make your stomach turn. Jonny travelled to Manilla to witness this brutal Good Friday tradition in which three men are nailed to crosses in a reenactment of the crucifixion. Other penances carried out on the day include self-flagellation, crawling on the rough ground and carrying giant crosses. Jonny has captured these events with care and sensitivity, and though the impact of these painful pictures is hard to deny there’s nothing gratuitous about his portrayal of this devout practice.

  6. Zoeghertner-itsnicethat-5

    I’d like to live in the world Zoe Ghertner creates with her camera. Sometimes I feel like I can almost hear her photos, rustling fabric over knees and the brush of neck hair against a collar, the sound that statues would make if they were quickly, secretly rearranging themselves into a more comfortable position without being seen. They’re fashion editorial photos, but with a sinister depth to them that is so often done in a ham-fisted way, but with Zoe is delivered as crisp as cut glass. The net draped over oranges like skin over joints, the spiked industrial hair curlers, and the uneasy pressure, suspense and delicacy of taut balloon animals. She’s fantastic.

  7. Maya-fuhr-itsnicethat-list

    Maya Fuhr is a photographer with an inexplicable ability to photograph young faces without losing any of the youthful disdain, muted excitement or quiet rebellion that play an integral part in being young. Which more or less makes her a natural fit for a fashion brand to shoot their campaign, don’t you reckon? John & Jenn has cottoned on, commissioning Maya to shoot their new collection of simple and structural pieces, and she did a lovely job of it; the resulting images are textural and tactile while maintaining the models’ quiet air of not-giving-a-shit. Somebody give the girl a billboard.

  8. Nathanaelturner-itsnicethat-main

    There’s something I can’t stop thinking about that Roger Dean said in an interview the other day. He was talking about people creating things, and was saying there’s no point in making something that looks like it is typically of this earth. He wants people to make things that look like they’re from another world, because why not? After reading what Roger Dean said, I came across LA photographer Nathanael Turner’s work, and realised that even though he’s shooting stuff that’s very much “of this earth” (people, computers, buildings) he’s fantastic at making them seem a little skewed from the norm.

  9. Paulsmith-instagram-itsnicethat-list

    “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes but in having new eyes.” The line is Marcel Proust’s, quoted by Paul Smith at an Instagram event in London last week in which the fashion designer and bona fide national treasure spoke about his love of the photo-sharing platform, his longstanding passion for photography and his incredulity at how many people look, but don’t see. It’s not a problem for Paul, who finds inspiration in all manner of things and takes the opportunity to absorb what he encounters in his day-to-day life.

    Paul was bitten by the photography bug after his dad – himself a keen amateur photographer – gave him a Kodak Retinette when he was just 11. His dad had converted the attic into a dark room and Paul remembers with relish the hours spent developing pictures, superimposing one visual over another and “holding back” the image. “I thought it was magical,” he says. He has taken photographs for years and at his offices, his designers can delve into huge folders of thousands of his pictures collected down the decades. “They are pretty well organised,” Paul says. “If you came in and said ‘Has he been to Greece?’ they’d be able to say yeah in June 2013 or whatever…”

  10. Larrysultan-pfh-10-int_copy

    Larry Sultan’s photography is imbued with both the traditions of documentary and staging, and captures suburban life often in his hometown in the San Fernando Valley. Pictures From Home is a project that spanned a decade featuring his mother and father as primary subjects.

  11. Harley-weirlandscapes

    How can Harley Weir take photographs of landscapes and capture a natural or industrial scene as if it were a pubescent teenager? Each one of these photos is vulnerable, oily, undulating, smelly, confused and slightly sad: like a grumpy 15-year-old fumbling about for clues of its existence.

  12. Frida-by%c2%a0ishiuchi-_50_-2012-2015%c2%a0(sunglasses)-int-list

    It’s always a thrill to rifle through other people’s bits and bobs, even more so if that other person is Frida Kahlo. Thanks to a series of images by Japanese photographer Ishiuchi Miyako we can do just that, taking a startlingly intimate-feeling journey through the particulars of the artist. The photographs, which are going on show in May at London’s Michael Hoppen gallery, were captured in 2013 and what makes them feel so eerie is perhaps the photographer’s diligent, cataloging approach to her subject matter. It’s telling that Ishiuchi knew little about the work of Frida, perhaps giving a stance which could be more critical and more focussed on the objects themselves rather than the meanings it’s so easy to imbue them with.

  13. Camille-summers-valli-int-list

    “Their agenda is that they want an activist film that goes into the history of their struggle and presents a contemporary portrait of what’s happening in Black Mesa right now. But it’s not an activist film. I think ultimately it has undertones of activism because of the subject matter, but an activist film follows a certain structure and I’m definitely moving more towards something else.”

  14. Namsa-leuba-khoisan-int-list

    In the past we’ve spoken about Namsa Leuba’s work only in the context of her fashion shoots for WAD magazine and Comme des Garçons, but these commissions came about because of her personal exploration of Guinean culture in a series called Ya Kala Ben. She’s also explored the traditions of a tribe called the Khoisan, one of the most divergent peoples in the world. As with many of her projects these images seek to subvert traditional perceptions of African culture by experimenting with anachronistic costumes and environments, and as ever they’re incredibly striking.

  15. Bodiam-sa-int-list

    Most of the time you’ll find Michael Bodiam hunched in his studio, carefully manipulating lighting and sets to achieve perfectly balanced, perfectly lit compositions for fashion and editorial clients. He’s great at this, but well aware you can’t spend all your time indoors. So a few times a year he jets off to far-flung corners of the world with his camera to apply everything he knows about photography to sprawling landscapes and foreign cities. In this instance he’s found himself wandering through South America capturing the diversity of rural and urban life to be found there.

  16. Tomas_werner_dolphins-int-list

    When Tim Berners Lee invented the internet, surely, SURELY he had images like these in mind. Perhaps he had loftier aims, but today this is the sort of thing we’re really after online: pictures of a small, cute, fluffy dog, sitting on things we don’t expect, shot beautifully. The man behind these images is Slovakian photographer Tomas Werner, who took more than 100 pictures of the little Pomeranian in Miami, which have now been drawn together in a book called A Handbook for Dog Walkers published by Gost.

  17. Laurel-golio-dancexplosion-int-list

    After Little Miss Sunshine I feel like the world of American pageantry is something I understand implicitly. Young girls travel the country with their drug-addled grandparents, suicidal uncles and mute brothers desperate to prove their worth as dancers, cheerleaders, singers and acrobats. I assumed that Laurel Golio’s series of photographs at Dance Xplosion might dispel these cinematic myths but it seems this is a fiercely competitive world of high drama and emotion. Laurel’s photos show just how much these kids, as well as their parents, are focussed on success, twerking, tapping and tangoing their way to middle American superstardom.

  18. Andreaslaszlokonrath-neilpatrickharris-int-list

    Photographer Andreas Laszlo Konrath hasn’t been on the site for far too long but there’s two good reasons to rectify that now. Firstly he’s just shot Josh Brolin for the new-look, newly biannual Port magazine and secondly because this year marks a decade since he upped sticks and moved to New York. Andreas has a diverse practice that flits between self-initiated projects and commissioned portraits and he’s equally confident working in either milieu. We’ve decided to focus on his celebrity shots here and his Port covers (both Josh Brolin and Sam Rockwell) are good places to start. There’s something unflinchingly intimate about the eye contact Andreas often captures (see also Ewan McGregor, Kendrick Lamar and a half-naked Neil Patrick Harris) but he’s no one-trick pony, and from Bryan Cranston peering into the middle distance to the top of David Byrne’s head, he has a real talent for making us feel connected to these stars in a very visceral way.

  19. Morganlevy-int-list

    The “commissioned” tab on Colorado-based photographer Morgan Rachel Levy’s website is a pretty diverse place. It spans a project about public schools, a series made in Ferguson following the shooting of Michael Brown and one collection about a map maker for Monocle among others, and nestled happily into the mix is this absolute stonker. 

  20. Farah-al-qasimi-int-list

    Photographer Farah Al Qasimi lives and works between Dubai and New York; her series The World Is Sinking depicts the areas of Dubai that prosperity forgets, all decayed McDonalds signs and bright murals surrounded by detritus. They’re great, I’m not sure if Farah uses high-saturation film or if Dubai is just consistently this sweet shade of saccharin – either way, I’m into it. She captures sand sculptures, bins and empty foyers with real aplomb. Farah graduated from Yale in 2012, and has since exhibited at Fotofest Abu Dhabi, New Yorks School of Visual Arts and the Meridian Art Center in Washington DC.

  21. List

    British photographer Carl Bigmore is living out a childhood obsession with the USA. The Londoner has just rounded off a project called Between Two Mysteries that’s seen him trawling the Pacific Northwest documenting the daily lives of its inhabitants; using personal pop culture references to contextualise the people he meets. “Since settlers followed the perilous Oregon Trail in search of prosperity in the 1800s,” he says, “the American imagination has left its imprint on the landscape. Oregon is forever haunted by the Overlook Hotel in Kubrick’s The Shining and its chilling analysis of the nation’s conflicted soul.”

  22. Gilesduley-legacyofwar-int-list

    A few months ago I had a beer with Giles Duley and conversation turned to what he was up to work-wise. He was relaxed, breezy even, when he told me he was hoping to launch a multi-faceted, multi-platform exploration of the ongoing effects of conflicts after they’ve supposedly ended. It sounded insanely ambitious; it also made whatever my professional plans were at the time seem pathetically puny. But on Friday, Giles’ project Legacy of War became a reality as it reached its £20,000 Kickstarter goal.

  23. Ohpearch-id-4-int_copy

    While casually knocking out impressive videos for Jungle, Oliver Hadlee Pearch has also been building up a fine portfolio of editorial photography. There’s a great atmosphere to his work; humour, poise and the impression that Oliver and his models have their tongues firmly in their cheeks. Even while performing incredible feats of synchronised dancing and photographing golden babes amongst Memphis furniture there’s an enviable sense of ease to his work, or rather confidence in the set-ups and their outcome. It’s refreshing to see someone with such a singular aesthetic running with it, and maintaining it so successfully.

  24. Avblp-ally-capellino-inty-list

    Fashion photographer Agnes Lloyd-Platt’s new lookbook for Ally Capellino’s SS15 campaign is an ode to bathroom dye jobs and co-ordinating your hair with your outfit colour at all times. She paired models with candy-coloured hair in all the best shades – peach, silvery grey, cobalt blue, and mint green – with accessories in corresponding colours.

  25. David-ryle-int-list-2

    It’s rare that mere mortal people can be made to look like superhumans without the aid of some fancy dress, but this series Skihopp (which is Norwegian for ski jump) by photographer David Ryle does it effortlessly. It follows a professional ski jumper as he ascends to the top of an impossibly high structure, pauses for a moment at the top to contemplate what he’s about to undertake, and then jumps, soaring effortlessly through the sky.

  26. Claudialegge-int-2

    Just off the coast of Cancun there is an area of ocean floor that has been transformed into a mysterious sculpture park. Aside from the occasional tourist and bull shark, it’s pretty deserted but for the stone figures scattered in the white sand, placed there by artist Jason deCaires Taylor back in 2009. Claudia Legge, a London-based photographer with a passion/addiction for shooting underwater, found out about this creepy tranquil sculpture park when she was in Mexico and wasted no time in getting below the surface with her camera to check it out. We spoke to her about the pretty breathtaking results of her dive, and the technical difficulties of doing such a shoot.

  27. Sophie-green-a-day-at-the-races-int-list

    “Rain, more rain, drunk people, high people, drum ’n bass, dodgy hair, flat caps, tattoos, gold chains, piercings, sun shine, tank tops, topless chests, slush puppies, hot dogs, chips, chicks, fast cars, pimped out cars, racer boy heaven…”

  28. Ash-thayer-kill-city-int-list-3

    New York City in the early 1990s was dramatically different to how we know it now, if Ash Thayer’s new book Kill City is anything to go by. The Lower East Side was overrun with derelict buildings and dingy corners, and having been kicked out of her Brooklyn apartment Ash came across a welcoming community at a squat called See Skwat. As publisher PowerHouse explains, in that era “squatters took over entire buildings, but these structures were barely habitable. They were overrun with vermin, lacking plumbing, electricity, and even walls, floors, and a roof. Punks and outcasts joined the squatter movement and tackled an epic rebuilding project to create homes for themselves.”

  29. Robin-maddock-gff-int-list-2

    Robin Maddock is currently working in Nigeria – a long old way from Plymouth, which was the setting for his series God Forgotten Face. The project condenses suburban British culture into a collection of curious and familiar photographs, made from the perspective of a photographer who is used to moving around frequently. “I wanted to use a place which I knew well, to show a wider feeling about England,” he explains to us. “My father is from Plymouth, so we visited my grandparents often when growing up in Singapore, and it made a very strong impression on me. All the history, especially the Blitz and its consequent post-war rebuild, speaks strongly about where we came from and what we wanted to be.”

  30. Laboratoryperfumes_l_kf_tonka-lr-int-list

    Fabulous photography, super set design and stunning scents. We’re starting to sound like a husky, sensual M&S advert. So before we delve into any more sensuous nonsense, we present a beautiful combination of all three of the aforementioned beauties: this gorgeous campaign for Laboratory Perfumes, entitled Imagining the Invisible. The images accompany the launch of the brand’s series The Lab, a range of “creative experiments in scent,” which look to the visual world to articulate how bloody lovely their perfumes are. These are shown on The Lab website, in images created by set design duo Lightning + Kinglyface (Anna Fulmine and Victoria Shahrokh, to the taxman), and photographed by Kate Jackling.

  31. Dbg-book-int-list

    We’re huge fans of David Brandon Geeting at It’s Nice That, so news that his work has been immortalised in the form of a gloriously colourful new publication by Pau Wau books was music to our tired ears. Infinite Power is full of his characteristic still lifes, removing everyday objects from common use to make them appear utterly isolated and a bit strange. Copper piping topped with an egg? Check. A fluffy rug paired with a garlic clove? It’s in there. A never-ending hug of extension leads? He’s got that too. David, you complete us.

  32. Ryan-lowry-int-list-2

    There are few out there who have shot Richard Branson posing beside a golden lift for Travel and Leisure, or Tavi Gevinson reclining serenely on her bed for The Great Discontent, which leads us to believe that Ryan Lowry is no ordinary photographer. Splitting his time between Chicago and NYC (although his site specifies that he is available for projects “everywhere in the world… E V E R Y W H E R E”) he’s racked up an incredible roster of clients with his candid, dynamic imagery, including Apartamento, commissioners of all things excellent Bloomberg Businessweek, Vice and Condé Nast, as well as a bunch of others. He seems to be part of a new school of portraiture photographers able to bypass all of the stale sitting about making idle conversation and jump straight to the part where you’re having a really good laugh with your subjects, and his work is all the better for it.

  33. Will-robson-scott-dogs-int-list

    I don’t care how many Tumblrs are littered with pictures of puppies or how many Instagram pugs make their way into my feed, there’s something irresistible about photographs of dogs with their owners. Especially when they look alike. Which having seen this new project from Will Robson-Scott and Ollie Grove, is, I can confirm, a real thing. It happens. They start to resemble one another.

  34. Ewen-spencer-int-list-new

    To describe Ewen Spencer as anything less than a pillar of British counterculture would be to do him an extreme disservice. Having served stints at iconic magazines The Face and Sleazenation in the 1990s he has since watched the rise and fall of UK garage, documented the grittiest corners of grime, shot teenagers partying in Napoli and Ayia Napa and caught the best of European styling which has made its way over to Miami. He actually told us about some of it at our Here conference last year, and if you’re interested you can watch the full talk here.

  35. Aishazeijpveld-whatremains-int-list

    Aisha Zeijpveld likes to toy with the viewer. She once overheard two girls discussing her work at a show, with one of them solemnly declaring that her photographs are “definitely Photoshopped.” In fact for the most part they’re not, but Aisha is an image-maker who enjoys confusing us as to what we think we’re seeing. Take her What Remains series from a couple of years ago that was inspired by Egon Schiele’s sketches and created alongside set designers Sara Ivanyi and Judith Veenendaal.

  36. Joejohnson-reno-3-int_copy

    Joe Johnson’s photo-essay The Playing Field documents Reno’s casinos in their spectacular neon glory, but completely empty. The interior architecture designed to delight, confuse and distract looks even more absurd deserted than when it’s packed with OAPs drinking Screwdrivers. Almost every surface is reflective and disorientating; those that aren’t project mountain-top lakes and seascapes.

  37. Eudes-de-santana-int-list

    Eudes de Santana’s photographic portfolio is almost suspiciously international. He has worked on commissions in London, Berlin, Cape Town and Barcelona as well as his home country of Brazil, piecing together a collection of images which are compelling and energetic, but which might lead you to believe he’s on a career-long holiday rather than busily working. On the contrary, it’s just that his clients – Zeit Magazine, Vice, Nike and Sony are known all over the world, giving him more-than-legit cause to travel to wherever the work is. And can you blame him?

  38. Larry-clark-int-list-2

    There are dream collaborations, and then there are those that seem to good to be true but happen anyway, which is probably the category we’d pop Larry Clark and J.W. Anderson in. The pair have gotten together to create a new book entitled The Smell of Us, which features the cast of Larry’s new film (of the same name) running riot around Paris, hanging out in hotel rooms in their pants and generally having the time of their lives, in a host of J.W. Anderson creations. Anderson’s stripy 1960s details give a happily retro vibe to Larry’s compositions, thrusting the cast into an era which reeks of greasy hair, fumbling encounters round the back of the Palais de Tokyo and that conspicuous trail of baccy in jeans back pockets.

  39. Garywallis-mcqueen-int-list

    There’s a wave of adoration sweeping across London for Alexander McQueen at the moment, almost exactly five years after his untimely death in 2010, and it feels something like a homecoming. This is due in no small part to the upcoming showing of Savage Beauty, an exhibition of his life’s work which was first seen at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art four years ago, and which will open at the V&A on 14 March with a wealth of new exhibits.

  40. Euan-int-main

    Before I begin can I just say that what you see in these photos is not LARP (Live Action Role Play), it’s SCA which stands for The Society for Creative Anachronism. The difference is where LARP is more playful, going out with your mates wearing costumes and wearing padding and bashing each other on the head, SCA is actually recreating aspects of primarily Medieval history down to the smallest detail in trams of craftsmanship. A bit like a theatrical production, but with jousting.