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Regulars / The Graduates 2016

Georgia Cranstoun’s process-driven style tests the rules of graphic design

Whether it’s still life photography, considered and painstaking editorial design or an ad campaign for a footwear company – Australia-born, London-based graphic designer Georgia Cranstoun has a portfolio of work that belies her age and shows she has used her time studying to explore a multitude of techniques and disciplines. “The areas that interest me most in graphic design are book layout, typography, and print. I think there is something so special about a well-designed book, a unique typeface and unfamiliar print design,” she says. “What is even more special is the experimentation and the journey to create such things; the idea of pushing the boundaries and breaking the rules to create something uncommon really drives me. In everything I create, I try to add a little bit of humour or tongue-in-cheek design, even if it’s not immediately obvious.”

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Georgia recently qualified with a BA in graphic design from Central St. Martins in London and has already completed internships with the likes of Made Thought, Protein and Bravo Charlie Mike Hotel. “Once I visited the campus, I knew that it was where I wanted to be. For me, growing up in Australia, CSM’s regard obviously reaches there too and it had been on my list of dream places to study,” she says. “To have then been offered a place, and on the graphic design course, it was a very easy yes.”

Her book Do rule breaking designers create better work? tests the format in the style of the people that it investigates and her rendered covers for Secret 7” hint that there is more great work to come from Georgia. “Even though it was one of the most stressful projects, I think I enjoyed creating Do rule-breaking Designers create better work?” the most. I decided to investigate this question explored through book publication. A series of three, these books (starting with a ‘rule-abiding’ layout) gradually progress into a more experimental/less functional book,” she says. “I really researched a lot of different designers and studios, not only in graphic design but furniture design and—more specifically—book design. I learnt so much by reading a lot of different texts and learning about new things.” The project helped her develop a process of testing and refinement that she will carry forward into her career. “I also think that there is some merit in designing different versions of things, and experimenting with layout by going too far and creating a piece that no longer works,” she explains. “You can always go back a step, but at least you’re pushing a few conventional ideas and the norm before doing so.”

Having enjoyed her time at CSM, Georgia plans to stay in the capital. “I’m going to stay in London, it’s so great for creative work and there’s so much culture and also so many exhibitions to see. I’m very fortunate to have a job in the industry now as well,” she says. “It’s important for me to keep on creating and making time for self-initiated work. I would love to found a really small, self-funded publishing house…but we’ll see. “

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Georgia Cranston: Secret 7"

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Georgia Cranston: Secret 7"

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Georgia Cranston: Objects in Space

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Georgia Cranston: Objects in Space

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Georgia Cranston: Do Rule Breaking Designers Create Better Work?

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Georgia Cranston: Do Rule Breaking Designers Create Better Work?

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Georgia Cranston: Do Rule Breaking Designers Create Better Work?

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Georgia Cranston: Do Rule Breaking Designers Create Better Work?

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Georgia Cranston: KUWTK Big Book

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Georgia Cranston: KUWTK Big Book

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Georgia Cranston: KUWTK

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Georgia Cranston: KUWTK

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Georgia Cranston: KUWTK

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Georgia Cranston: Nowhere In Particular

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Georgia Cranston: Nowhere In Particular

G . F Smith

It’s Nice That’s Graduates 2016 is kindly supported by G . F Smith, whose gorgeous range of papers and services can be just the thing for new and soon-to-be creative grads. The 130-year-old paper company has a long history of working with designers and artists at all stages of their careers, with its high-quality and innovative paper products offering a huge range of creative possibilities.