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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

Illustration

Our third #ThroughTheEyesOf feature with Ace&Tate features Jack Taylor

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Here at It’s Nice That we spend an awful lot of time talking about, thinking about and writing about creatives but ultimately we don’t get too many chances to really see what goes on in their day-to-day working lives…until now. Our new collaboration with super-cool eyewear brand Ace & Tate – who believe in great design and ultimate customer choice – is taking us inside the studios, and inside the minds, of a host of some of our favourite creatives.

Over a six-week period, our #ThroughtheEyesOf project will give us an unparalleled insight into how six creatives see the world and how that impacts the way they create work. All six will be producing a bespoke poster themed loosely around “Graduation," and we’ll be getting up close and personal with their progress over on their Instagram accounts before the final pieces are unveiled at an exhibition later this summer.

Next up is the beautiful mind of illustrator and artist Jack Taylor…

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    Jack Taylor (Photo by Brian Doherty)

Could you sum up what you do in a single sentence?

I am a freelance artist and illustrator, working in areas from editorial illustration to book making, with a specific interest in storytelling and printmaking.

What do you mainly use Instagram for?

Just really for showing people the process of my work, something that inspires me, or a sneak peek of a project I am working on.

When and where did you graduate from? What are your memories of that?  

I graduated from the Illustration and Animation course at Kingston in the summer of last year. It was an amazing three years and completely changed the way I think when making my work. The course is very concept-led and a lot of the work I made there didn’t take the form of illustrations; it was great to be experimental and work in a bunch of different ways. It also made me realise illustration was the path I wanted to go down.

How do you feel about opening up your creative process in this way?

I really like the idea of showing my inspirations and just snippets of my work, I don’t want to reveal too much. I am really interested to hear how people are imagining the work to look like from what I post, compared to what it actually is when it is revealed.

Give us a clue what we can expect from your artwork?

A struggle, that’s all I am going to say!

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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    Jack Taylor for It’s Nice That + Ace & Tate present #ThroughTheEyesOf

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