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    Emily Maye: Cycling

Photography

Photographer Emily Maye specialises in cycling and it's not hard to see why

Posted by Barbara Ryan,

LA-based Emily Maye photographs cyclists both on and off the road and she does it really, really well. Her cycling books capture the whole spectacle of racing, avoiding the obvious dramatic action shots of collisions and falls to show the race beyond the start and finish lines. The energy of the crowd, checking race tan lines, fixing chains, filling water bottles – Emily shows us something very different to the television cameras but loses none of the drama or determination. On the roadside you can miss the cyclists as they shoot past in the blink of an eye but these photos show the long endurance of the ride. 

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

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    Emily Maye: Cycling

Posted by Barbara Ryan

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