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It's Nice That No.8: Full Contents

Posted by It’s Nice That, 08 March 2012

Although our upcoming issue doesn’t officially launch until 21st March, we’re super excited to announce its full contents – a menagerie of in-depth interviews and original features so varied and exciting we suggest you sit down before taking it all in – as well as a sneak peek at its cover. Remember, too, that if you order your copy before the 21st March cut-off point you’ll receive this issue’s exclusive free print – a sublime, A1-sized church ceiling by photographic genius Cyril Porchet…

Profiles
14 of the most exciting artists, illustrators, designers and photographers profiled in short but fascinating form

Brecht Evens
Eric Cahan
Jayson Musson
Luis Gispert
Makoto Azuma
Mark Mulroney
Mirko Borsche
Raphael Garnier
Ruth van Beek
Samuel Henne
Erwan Frotin
Lucas Blalock
Savinder Bual
Bill Durgin

Interviews
In-depth conversations with a mix of emerging and established creatives at the top of their games

John Pawson on the benefits of minimalism
Slavs and Tatars on the importance of humour
John Wood and Paul Harrison on the art of slapstick
Deyan Sudjic on the future museum
Paula Scher on the necessity of mistakes
MVRDV on architectural icebreakers

Reports
Two insightful essays on contemporary issues

Francesca Gavin on the future of the exhibition space
Liv Siddall on Michael Landy’s proposed Olympic Tower

Features
A set of original photo stories around the theme of space

Tung Walsh on the Barbican conservatory
Bompas and Parr on London via smell
Cyril Porchet on beautiful Baroque-era church ceilings
Nathan Cowen and Jacob Klein (aka Haw-lin) on architectural space

Regulars
Our regular pieces, only better

Todd Zuniga’s bookshelf
Suggestions
The End by Joe Dunthorne

Pre-order now

Publication

It's Nice That No.8: Full Contents

Posted by It's Nice That,

Although our upcoming issue doesn’t officially launch until March 21, we’re super excited to announce its full contents – a menagerie of in-depth interviews and original features so varied and exciting we suggest you sit down before taking it all in – as well as a sneak peek at its cover. Remember, too, that if you order your copy before the March 21 cut-off point you’ll receive this issue’s exclusive free print – a sublime, A1-sized church ceiling by photographic genius Cyril Porchet…

Nice

Posted by It's Nice That

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