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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

Graphic Design

Peckham Print Studio's wonderful new website designed by Mike Guppy

Posted by James Cartwright,

We’ve discussed Peckham Print Studio’s work on the site before. The south London-based screen printing studio keep popping up at events and exhibitions all over the Capital, showing anyone who’ll watch how to pull a super-tight screen print and use the process to make the best of their artwork. As well as workshops and events, they also print commercially for the likes of Kemistry Gallery, Ozwald Boateng, Sunspel and Urban Outfitters. But what makes these guys really interesting (aside from the quality of their work) is their approach to their online presence. Having just re-launched a website that’s leaps ahead of their competitors we caught up with Mike Guppy, the man who built it all, to find out about how and why it was done.

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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

How did you start working with PPS?

Hugh and I were living together when Peckham Print Studio launched, and I had just started working at Hover Studio around the same time, so I offered to build the site. They had the beginnings of a logo and knew what typeface they wanted to use, so a visual identity and brand developed out of the design of the site. Everything was new and fresh, and there was a lot of excitement around the guys, so it was nice that they completely trusted me and allowed me a lot of creative freedom.

What’s changed since the last version of the site?

This new iteration of the site was a chance to improve and tighten up all aspects of the design and code. Diving back into old code after a year and a half is like meeting your past self, so I ended up rebuilding a lot of it. The guys also have a clearer purpose for the site now. When they started, they didn’t have this awesome portfolio and wealth of content that they have now.

How did you approach the design? What was the most important thing that the site had to do?

We essentially went to the drawing board again. They asked the right questions of the guys and we got a clear site map together. I went away with this and re-designed each page, making sure I got the typography and layout consistent.

As a designer and developer, I know straight off how things will work in code, which means I can make those decisions throughout the design and development process, meaning a better crafted product hopefully.

The main thing the site had to do was be super simple to use, put the most important information in the right places, and be a good showcase for all the work PPS have done in the past two years

What are you most proud of in the new site?

I think the thing myself and the guys are proud of is that they are way out in front of their competitors with this site. There aren’t really many printing services that showcase their work in this way, and have a strong visual brand.

Any falling out during the process?

No fallings out no. It can be hit or miss when working with friends, but the collaboration was really good. I guess that’s the thing; You know the project has been a success when it has felt closer to a collaboration than just a client/designer(server?) relationship.

What other freelance bits are you working on at the moment?

Before I started working at Hover I was freelancing, so there are always little bits and pieces from past clients. I’m working on a bit of an update for photographer, Jake Green at the moment, but I have some personal projects in mind I would like to pursue, so its about trying to make time for that stuff!

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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

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    Mike Guppy: Peckham Print Studio Website

Jc

Posted by James Cartwright

James started out as an intern in 2011 and is now one of our two editors. He oversees Printed Pages magazine and content wise has a special interest in graphic design and illustration. He also runs our online shop Company of Parrots and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

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