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    Stefan Sagmeister: The Happy Show invite

Sagmeister's hunt for happiness documented in new show

Posted by Rebecca Fulleylove,

There are times when we should be really happy, like when seeing a baby laugh for the first time, when friends get married, or the day the filling of our sandwich is well-ratioed. But what about our overall happiness? Having been mulled over by psychologists, philosophers and sociologists among others, graphic designer extraordinaire, Stefan Sagmeister has decided to tackle the issue in his own way.

Over the past year, Sagmeister has been working on The Happy Film in which he aims to answer the question of whether it’s possible to train your mind into being happy. Documenting the results, the designer has adopted the positive psychology school of thought, and has concluded that the three most agreed-upon routes to happiness were meditation, cognitive behavioural therapy and psychotropic drugs. As a result the relatively chirpy chap has gone through three months of intense meditation and intimate therapy sessions for the first time. So next up? Drugs but nothing too badass.

Alongside the documentary, by-products in the form of art and design works have culminated into what’s now become an exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia which opened yesterday called The Happy Show. A more detailed preview of the film will be presented at the show as well a whole host of other pieces many of which interact with the existing features of the space.

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    Stefan Sagmeister: TRYING TO LOOK GOOD LIMITS MY LIFE, 2004

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    Stefan Sagmeister: TRYING TO LOOK GOOD LIMITS MY LIFE, 2004

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    Stefan Sagmeister: TRYING TO LOOK GOOD LIMITS MY LIFE, 2004

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    Stefan Sagmeister: TRYING TO LOOK GOOD LIMITS MY LIFE, 2004

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    Stefan Sagmeister: TRYING TO LOOK GOOD LIMITS MY LIFE, 2004

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Posted by Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca joined us as an editorial intern after studying at Norwich University College of the Arts. She wrote for the site between March and June 2012