• Ana-carolina-gomes

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Ana Carolina Gomes

  • Jack-hudson

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Jack Hudson

  • Anna-brooks

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Anna Brooks

  • Luke-archer

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Luke Archer

  • Matt-peel

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Matthew Peel

  • Samantha-harvey

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Samantha Harvey

  • Owen-gatley

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Owen Gately

  • Miles-gould

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Miles Gould

  • Romilly-winter

    Graduates 2010 Catch-Up, Romilly Winter

Graphic Design

The Graduates: 2010 Catch-Up Part I

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

As our call for The Graduates 2011 comes to a close, we’ve decided to revisit last year’s featured few. So in this, part one of our catch-up with the various talented graphic designers and illustrators from the class of 2010, we asked each year-old graduate to show us an image that sums up their year. As with Romilly Winter’s Salad Niçoise, some of these images needed a little explaination so in this article you will find a small paragraph from each creative, plus some concentrated musings for the future…

Ana Carolina Gomes

The image I chose is by Berlin-based Eberhard Havekost, from a series of painted images based on photographic sources that I think epitomise the past year: a mixture of blurred hues that in the end turned out to be quite clear and rewarding. I recently joined O-SB Design as their junior designer, the very first interview I went to after graduating. However, before I was in a position to take the job, there was a lot I had to learn and experience elsewhere. I interned at Interbrand and Rose Design, both of which proved invaluable. And it is only because of these experiences that I’ve been able to come back full circle and find myself at O-SB, one year older and one year wiser, ready for the challenges ahead. As for the future, I’d love to travel more and to experience different cultures and backgrounds. Ultimately I hope that I continue to learn and do new things that keep me excited and passionate.
www.flickr.com/anacarolinagomes
www.itsnicethat.com/ana-carolina-gomes

Jack Hudson

As you’ve probably gathered, this is an image of me in my studio surrounded by some inspirational bits and pieces and also some work taken from my portfolio. This image seems to fit best with my year since graduating as I’ve begun my first year of full-time freelance work. I’ve been lucky enough to have worked with some great clients along the way, all of which I’m extremely grateful for! Other interesting discoveries this year include: David Hockney’s book ‘That’s the Way I See it’, my love for Jamaican jerk chicken, Bruce Bickford’s documentary ‘Monster Road’ and finally the joys of surfing a crowd with my brother Thomas. What’s Next? My list includes: To Keep working as I am; finish my first small press book; move to Spain next year for a few months; get back into animation; work on some live action projects; travel around and keep progressing!
www.jack-hudson.com
www.itsnicethat.com/jack-hudson

Anna Brooks

When I think of my first year out I will never forget this suitcase. It’s the one thing I can guarantee to have had with me and it has remained an indispensable object. It’s looked after my clothes and possessions as I have moved from sofa to bed to sofa. Without my clothes I wouldn’t have been able to intern or to work! I will look forward to getting rid of it soon and replacing it with a wardrobe. What’s next? Next hour: A cup of tea. Next Day: A holiday. Next Month: A home in Hackney. Next year: Continuing to live, work and play in East London!
www.anna-brooks.com
www.itsnicethat.com/anna-brooks

Luke Archer

This year I have been mostly making fonts. Next year I will be mostly making fonts.
www.lukearcher.co.uk
www.itsnicethat.com/luke-archer

Matthew Peel

This is a picture of a studio I did a placement at a few months ago. It sums up my year as it describes the transition from leaving college to taking my first steps into the industry. The last twelve months have absolutely flown by and have been really enjoyable – leaving college was in some ways a great relief, as it was a pretty intense final year. It’s been great to work in various studios or with clients and to continue building on my knowledge, no matter how large or small the lesson has been! My ambitions for the near future involve a new website, working and living abroad and maintaining work on personal and freelance projects. Once I’ve gained enough experience my ultimate goal is to set up a practice.
www.matthewpeel.co.uk
www.itsnicethat.com/matthew-peel

Samantha Harvey

I’ve recently started making photographic gifs and my image is from a gif I recently made for the cover of le cool London magazine (you can see it here). I think it represents the last year because I’ve found it really is tough sticking to what you want to do after leaving uni (and finding the time). To be able to make creative work and continue experimenting I think you have to be quite determined, so I was quite excited to make some work for le cool and have complete creative freedom to do so. What’s next? To keep making more work of my own and challenge myself in what I can do, and to meet more people with similar attitudes.
www.samantha-harvey.co.uk
www.itsnicethat.com/samantha-harvey

Owen Gatley

For the most part, moving back home after uni sucked. On the plus side, it did allow me to knuckle down with my work and also spend a lot more time with my family and girlfriend. It’s been particularly cool hanging out with my little niece Lola (pictured above), seeing her grow and develop at such a ridiculous rate has been a pretty special thing to witness. She is one cool cat. I’m moving to Berlin next week. This is exciting for a number of reasons, and also means I’ll no longer be working from my bedroom and I’ll also have a studio buddy! Work wise, when I’ve got a bit of time, I think I’m going to make another pop-up book, but this time make an edition of them – that would be swell.
www.owengatley.co.uk
www.itsnicethat.com/owen-gatley

Miles Gould

Over the last year I have been busy continuously producing and exploring. My first stop was the islands of Thailand, to recoup, to get some fresh inspiration and to build a plan. On returning I was offered a four month internship in Zurich at Studio CRR where my skills really developed and matured both conceptually and technically. Since returning, I have been freelancing for a few studios, one being We Like Today, a company which has opened up opportunities to work on some really exciting design projects, including a green architectural redevelopment in Greenwich, a newspaper design for the city of Sittingbourne and signage for a Nike store in Lisbon. Alongside this I am undertaking some personal projects with good friend Pete Dungey, which includes an identity for a race horse syndicate and an editorial/photographic piece based on the recent recycling of ‘The Letzigrund Stadium’ in Zurich. I am currently looking for a full-time junior designer position at an exciting studio based in the UK.
www.milesgould.com
www.itsnicethat.com/miles-gould

Romilly Winter

Salad Niçoise is just one of the many dishes on the lunch menu at Praline and, as I have been at the studio for nearly 9 months, I thought it best to showcase this daily experience as a ‘round up’ of my 1st year since graduating. What’s next? Well at the moment I am working at Praline design studio and have done since November last year, so I am going to continue soaking up design goodness from the Praline chaps, take on freelance projects and perhaps eventually move on to somewhere new in the future but there are no plans to do so at the moment. I am excited at the prospect of entering my 2nd year since graduating and I welcome it with open arms.
www.romillywinter.co.uk
www.itsnicethat.com/romilly-winter

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

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