• Things_big

    Things

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    Serge vs. Spaceship Earth

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    Serge vs. Spaceship Earth

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    Paper Sound

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    Paper Sound

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    Paper Sound

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    Paper Sound

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    Paper Sound

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    the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much.

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    the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much.

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    the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much.

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    the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much.

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    the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much.

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    Marin, Jack, Ellie

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    Marin, Jack, Ellie

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    Marin, Jack, Ellie

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    Marin, Jack, Ellie

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    Hungry?

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    Hungry?

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    Hungry?

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    Hungry?

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    Hungry?

Illustration

Things

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

Here is this week’s crop of the post bags and hand-delivered goodies, complete with cook book, photo zine and some especially talented illustrators’ efforts. Serge Seidlitz, Harriet Cory-Wright, Bruno Zhu & Mengxi Zhang, Jack Hughes, Marin Matsuo, Ellie Tzoni and everyone at Innocent can share this excellent edition of Things with the anniversary of the Apollo 11 launch. Which I think we can all agree is very cool.

Serge vs. Spaceship Earth Serge Seidlitz

Really nice screen printed graphic illustration from Serge in advance of his upcoming show. Which, if his super-prolific portfolio is anything to go by, should make for good viewing. It’s an easy-going style that belies such a bold statement as taking on the world. Go for it we say, we’re looking forward to the exhibition/death match. While on the subject, Buckminster Fuller once wrote a book about operating Spaceship Earth which Serge should probably read before jumping into the ring.
www.sergeseidlitz.com

Paper Sound Harriet Cory-Wright

Paper Sound “navigates through the rhythmic and temporal dimensions of a world described by J.G Ballard in The Sound-Sweep.” From this most intriguing opening, this carefully cloth-spined book with risographed, bible thin pages, moves into some of the promised abstract landscapes and textured layers that fit the meta-heavy prose of JGB. Lovely pencil skills and perspective-less composition, all very pleasing to the eye.
www.harrietcorywright.com

the palace explodes the shrimp bail, when the flower want to oxygen and nutrition, i will help too much. Bruno Zhu & Mengxi Zhang

Like a game of consequences, each colour photo by Bruno is answered or questioned by Mengxi’s black & whites. They show us their experiences and their different perspectives, a shared love of the obscure and the unexpected places you can find it. Each image is a random/bleak/bright/astute narrative appendage, that instead of being freakish to look at makes a quite lovely whole, with an excellent sense of humour and healthy irony.
www.mengxiz.com
www.brunozhu.tumblr.com

Marin, Jack, Ellie Jack Hughes, Marin Matsuo, Ellie Tzoni

A refreshingly friendly team effort from three Kingston illustration graduates Jack, Marin and Ellie. Just like a fun picnic, the combination of each person’s work makes each piece even better. With a big emphasis on equality (three colours, three sheets. three websites etc.) you may think that it is a collaborative project; however what this really contains is three very separate and personal projects, linked only by the friendship of the creators and the quality of the prints.
www.jack-hughes.com
www.marin-matsuo.com
www.ellietzoni.co.uk

Hungry? Everyone at Innocent

Best read at lunch! Reading about food is wonderful, eating food is even better – is this the augmented reality all the digital designers are promising us? It’s very good. Branding is as branding does and 99% of the recipes are simple as. Except the foccacia recipe which I don’t trust, from personal experience it has destroyed all self- confidence and desire to bake. Cooking-by-colour aesthetics, easy graphics, playful photography and an excellent recipe for banana ice-cream.
www.innocentdrinks.co.uk

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Illustration View Archive

  1. Main9

    Edward Cushenberry actually wrote to me to show me a really interesting photography project he’s working on at the moment. Unfortunately that was about the millionth interesting photography project we had seen this week, but one thing we were a bit short on was brilliant, entertaining, lo-fi illustration we could relate to. Let’s give a warm welcome then to Edward’s comics in which he deals with traumatic or memorable experiences from his own memory, or borrowed from this friends. His drawings cover such life topics as How to Properly Bury A Turtle and that awkward moment when the girl you kissed says that making out with you was “like drinking a glass of water.” Classic. Edward’s got his fingers in a lot of creative pies, but I’d say these comics were our personal favourites.

  2. Sdlist

    Girls just wanna… doodle! Celebrities including Yoko Ono, Sarah Silverman, Pussy Riot and Courtney Love are backing a Kickstarter project to inspire girls to get drawing. Confidence, curiosity, courage and creativity are terms being bandied around by the School of Doodle, which will be “a free online high school for the imagination” where teen girls can take part in lessons taught by artists or peers. It might sound a little cheesy, but with brilliant creatives like artist John Baldessari, Kim Hasreiter, founder of Paper magazine, and Salman Rushdie signed up as teachers, it promises great things.

  3. List_2

    It’s not especially often that creatives flock to Cornwall en masse, but the little nook of England has been awash with activity this weekend due to Port Eliot festival, featuring musicians, artists, fashion designers and journalists. It also saw the launch of The Girl Who Fell to Earth, a story written by Luella Bartley and illustrated by Zoë Taylor, a graphic artist we make no secret of our love for.

  4. Main

    It’s not only the level of detail in Laurie Lipton’s drawings which is crazy; the illustrations are too. With charcoal and pencil she creates bonkers worlds in black and white which look like pictures for a short story written by the love child of Charles Dickens and George Orwell. The blacking factory meets Big Brother.

  5. List

    Ping Zhu is a force to be reckoned with in the world of illustration. Not only is she talented, mastering an inimitable style in every way imaginable, and then using it as very efficient bait to reel in the big clients, The Sunday Times, Pentagram and Nobrow included, but she’s also future proof – developing her style with every project she undertakes to make her as exciting as she is reliable, and delivering consistently good work to a broad spectrum of briefs.

  6. Mt101top

    There’s some schadenfreude at play in Masami Tsukishima’s illustrations. His series Life Of A Salesman follows lonely suited blokes trudging to and from work, talking on their phones and lugging their suitcases. I like how he plays with the angles of his illustrations; life is literally an uphill struggle for some of these poor office drones, as they plod along lanes slanting up and away from them. There’s also some sort of alternate universe in the series, where trains go up in flames and spread-eagled salesmen fall through the sky and run away from looming giant iPhones. One second the salesmen are sedately reading their emails, the next everything has spiralled out of control. The sentiment is a tongue-in-cheek 21st century Japanese rendering of “Slough”. I’m guessing Masami Tsukishima doesn’t wear a suit to work.

  7. Glaserlist

    We adore this article from NYT’s T Magazine today, in which a heap of creatives sing hallelujah for old school artistic tools, with brilliant illustrations to boot.

  8. List

    There are several reasons why we love Kyle Pellet and everything that comes out of his Pellet Factory, but first and foremost on the list is that his work is good, plain, unadulterated fun. There’s no need to muse on his choice of medium, or the narratives which seem to run from one image to the next, or the squishy-faced characters who pop up again and again, because why would you when you can look at them, laugh and imagine you’re running through a gallery with a pack of assorted animals? Turns out he’s been incredibly busy churning out work at an impressive rate, so here’s an update on what he’s been up to! If you’re curious, you can also check out five of his favourite books over here on his bookshelf.

  9. Gflist

    Doodling isn’t just for school kids. It’s about discovery. “It’s a healthy way to let it all out, with no restrictions or external rules,” says Guy, a designer and illustrator. “You just go for it.” Every single page of his sketchbooks is packed with faces, animals, monsters, questions and squiggles. “Sometimes you’ll draw a face or a hand or a dog in a way you’ve never seen or done before and that’s always a good feeling. And sometimes you just make yourself laugh!”

  10. Main9

    Scrolling through Marcel George’s hand-painted watercolour illustrations is like going on safari. Lipsticks hiding behind palm fronds, flamingos stalking around sunglasses, the Lacoste crocodile roaring at trainers.

  11. Dadulist

    There’s something otherworldly about Dadu Shin’s illustrations. Miniature people wander about an overgrown fairy-tale forest, an avatar-like hand reaches out into a tie-dye galaxy, a man walks a lonely path over rocks which form the silhouette of a woman’s face.

  12. List

    As far as I can tell, there will always be a place for clean, stylish, witty illustration in the pages of today’s most esteemed media outlets, and for as long as that is the case illustrator Ben Wiseman isn’t going to have any trouble finding work. He’s nailed his aesthetic, communicating funny, satirical observations in neat, stripped back images and vibrant colours, and sure enough, clients have cottoned on. His portfolio includes a TIME magazine cover alongside work the The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Le Monde and This American Life, a corker of a list which just about makes him Brooklyn’s poster boy for editorial illustration. And thank god, because the black and white pages of the aforementioned publications sure would be dull without him.

  13. Main

    It’s very exhilarating to see people taking something destructive and turning it into something creative; with that in mind please welcome the Computer Virus Catalog.