• Things_big

    Things

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    McSweeney’s #38

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    McSweeney’s #38

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    McSweeney’s #38

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    McSweeney’s #38

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    McSweeney’s #38

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    Museum’s Press Anthology

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    Museum’s Press Anthology

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    Museum’s Press Anthology

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    Museum’s Press Anthology

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    Museum’s Press Anthology

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    Phillip Harris

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    Phillip Harris

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    Phillip Harris

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    Phillip Harris

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    MONO. KULTUR #28

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    MONO. KULTUR #28

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    MONO. KULTUR #28

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    MONO. KULTUR #28

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    MONO. KULTUR #28

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    Visual Complexity

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    Visual Complexity

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    Visual Complexity

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    Visual Complexity

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    Visual Complexity

Writing

Things

Posted by It's Nice That,

So Things this week contains McSweeney’s number 38 of their ever-great quarterly, unsurprisingly heavy on the text. Visual antidotes come from Museums Press with their illustrated anthology, Visual Complexity and Phillip Harris, who provides some surreal relief. Not forgetting Mono.Kultur who’s latest is a Bless design special.

McSweeney’s Quarterly No. 38 McSweeney’s

Well, I remember when it was McSweeney’s 13. Now I feel old (or just six and a quarter years older). The inimitable literary anthology returns with written contributions from Ariel Dorfman, Roddy Doyle and the man himself, Dave Eggers. Also, and quite lovely it is, is a comic insert (but you can’t take it out) by Brit comic ace, Jack Teagle. Excellent cover (Jessica “Drop Cap” Hische!) and all-round design as always.
www.mcsweeneys.net

Visual Complexity: Mapping patterns of information Manuel Lima

There’s definitely always been something beautiful about accurate, colour-coded graphs. Manuel Lima, a fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts, has collated his almost psychotically accurate diagrams into one large, date filled book. For a tome so based on maths, it’s still completely coffee-table worthy. CNN rightly says of Lima’s work: “When it comes to making data sexy, you can’t be too graphic.”
www.visualcomplexity.com

The Museums Press Anthology Various excellent artists

A wonderful anthology of illustration/art/greatness kindly sent by the good people of Museums Press in Glasgow. A stream of black and white – and often pretty hilarious -illustrations lie between the fluorescent Morgan Blair front and back covers. These include some particularly strong work by Andy Rementer, James Benjamin Franklin and Rob Phoenix.
www.museumspress.co.uk

The World of Animals, Strange and Surreal, The Story of Stone and Steel Phillip Harris

There’s something intensely satisfying about illustration that’s thick with detail, and Phillip Harris’ work is no exception. From the laboriously cross-hatched drawings to the Victorian costumes of his characters, Harris’ work is steeped in a distinctly British history that recalls William Hogarth and Arthur Rackham. He’s also tremendously skilled at drawing animals. I like his pig.
www.philipharrisillustration.blogspot.com

BLESS MONO. KULTUR issue #28 Design by Manuel Raeder

Printed on uncoated stock that’s heavy with ink, issue #28 of MONO. KULTUR is a deliciously tactile little volume, particularly apt given the focus of the issue is BLESS studio – fashion pioneers and inventors of the fur wig. The double-gatefold magazine is divided neatly between interview and lookbook exploring the studio’s origins and inspiration.
www.mono-kultur.com
www.bless-service.de
www.manuelraeder.co.uk

Nice

Posted by It's Nice That

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Most Recent: Publication View Archive

  1. List

    Photographer James Pearson-Howes has spent the past eight years immersed in the strange, mythical world of British folk culture. The London-based creative has become obsessed with the darker sides of our islands ritualistic past; the green men, morris dancers and wicker costumes, as well as customs native to single villages in the West Country. His photographs have now been brought together into three books, printed by Ditto Press, and a limited edition of 20 bound together into the British Folk Trilogy, a comprehensive collection of images that define our bizarre past. The book is as rare as hens’ teeth, so if you want one you’d best contact James at once.

  2. Mjmain

    A bright red book emblazoned with gold type exclaiming “MICHAEL JACKSON” is like the art publication version of click-bait. Michael Jackson and Other Men is a collection of drawings by artist Dawn Mellor, produced when she was a teenager and she was really, really into Michael Jackson. “However commonplace these kind of adolescent drawings might be, they are a precursor to Dawn’s concern with celebrity and fan culture; also functioning as subjective social documents,” say Studio Voltaire, who published the title. “There is something endearing, and somewhat pathetic, about the Jackson drawings – both as a reminder of a tragic cultural icon and the indication of the burgeoning sexuality and artistic ambition of the young artist.”

  3. List

    It seems that Jacob Klein and Nathan Cowen are incapable of turning out a dud project. From their humble beginnings as a meticulously curated stream of stunning imagery to their present guise as multi-faceted design and art direction agency, the Haw-Lin boys just keep on coming up with the goods. This might not seem surprising to devotees of their original Haw-Lin blog, but it’s surprising how often arbiters of style lack substance. Not so for these boys; their fanatical eye for detail goes beyond simple aesthetic curation, extending into a portfolio of capsule collections for fashion brands, editorial shoots for the most erudite magazines and immaculate lookbooks that manage to add depth and pace to publications that can often be painfully bland.

  4. Pp-preorder-list

    We’ve been on the edge of our seats waiting to announce the arrival of the Autumn issue Printed Pages, but it’s going to be at the printers for another whole week, and we couldn’t handle the anticipation any more.

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    Circular is the members magazine of the Typographic Circle, a not-for-profit organisation that unites type designers and enthusiasts the world over. Included in its members’ list are names like Ken Garland, Angus Hyland and Jonathan Barnbrook, so the design of each issue HAS to be up to scratch. For its 18th edition the mighty Pentagram have continued their design duties, with Dominic Lippa and Jeremy Kunze overseeing the project.

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    I am a big believer that every magazine should be able to sum up what it does in a few words. New title The-Art-Form does just that with the pithy statement that it’s “a limited edition publication about art and artists.” Issue one features six artists – Ian Davenport, Peter Liversidge, Rana Begum, Dan Baldwin, Michael Reisch and Paul Insect – and each has been asked 13 questions ranging from why they make art to their favourite place. The answers vary not only in tone and subject matter (as you’d expect) but also in form, so while Ian has provided handwritten answers, Michael, Dan and Rana have created paintings, drawings and sketches in response to the questionnaire.

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    Nourished Journal is a new bi-annual lifestyle magazine from MADE Publishers, the same stable who bring us MADE Quarterly and The Process Journal. Beyond that it’s quite hard to pinpoint what it’s about, and that’s kind of the point, as it aims to reflect “a holistic view of life.”

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    Back in 2012, New York-based “computer programmer, composer and artist” (the order is his) Cory Arcangel started a Twitter feed called Working On My Novel. It Retweets people who use that phrase, and now Cory has published a book which brings together a selection of some of those Tweets (all with the permission of the authors it should be noted).

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    One day news might reach us of a Unit Editions publication that doesn’t knock our socks off but to paraphrase Gladiator “not yet…not yet.” Type Plus is the latest title from Adrian Shaughnessy and Tony Brook’s imprint and it sets out “to investigate the practice of combining typography with images to increase effectiveness, potency and visual impact.”

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    Thomas Rousset and Raphaël Verona’s Waska Tatay is fairly ambiguous at first glance. The cover is a simple yellow-to-blue fade with the title placed inconspicuously on the spine; but the content is altogether more arresting. Using a mixture of reportage and staged portraiture the photo book documents the pair’s trip to the Altiplano region of Bolivia and their encounters with witch doctors, spiritual healers and medicine men; uncovering the rites and rituals of these ancient orders and illuminating some of their extraordinary mythologies.

  11. List

    The ongoing success of the Plant Journal has re-engaged readers with the botanical world through an art and design lens; now a new book plans to take this exploration even further.

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    Food passages in books have always been some of my favourites in terms of creating flavoursome texture and setting a scene. There’s something so delicious about reading what your favourite characters are eating and drinking, and food descriptions really bring a setting alive. That chowder scene in Moby Dick has remained in my mind as being one of the cosiest and scrumptiously rustic meals, and all of my winter soups aspire to Melville’s hearty description.

  13. List

    I’m loathe to use the term “coffee table book” for a publication which seems to demand to be read anywhere and everywhere, rather than sitting untouched next to a selection of coasters. Still, the new tome by photographer Kenny Braun necessitates it; Surf Texas is a book so good that you’ll be desperate to keep it where it can be seen by anyone who might be passing idly through your living room.