Ms-300

Assistant Editor Maisie joined It’s Nice That fresh out of university in the summer of 2013 and has stayed with us ever since. She has a particular interest in art, fashion and photography and is a regular on our Studio Audience podcast.

ms@itsnicethat.com@maisieskidmore

1042 articles
  1. Jen-stark-whirl-side-int-10

    If it isn’t broke then there’s absolutely no need to even think about fixing it, as artist Jen Stark is fully aware, and there’s nothing broken about her geometric papercut sculptures. The LA-based artist has been making such work for literally as long as It’s Nice That has been running – here’s the first time we ever posted about her, back in 2007 – and although her work continues to grow in intricacy, she’s stayed true to her roots. These days her sculptures are made more and more often inside huge, unassuming black and white boxes, recreating the feeling that you’re a child about to unbundle a giant parcel of joy on Christmas morning, and they’re still as impressive as they were eight years ago.

  2. Boyocollage-int-list

    Some budding young design talents fresh out of university might harbour resentment about being thrust into a new job at a design studio as a “photocopier boy” (his words), but Patrick Waugh is not one of them. Instead he took full advantage of the rich archive at his disposal in his earliest and most junior jobs to make copies. Lots of them. And then took a scalpel and some masking tape to them, and transformed them into something altogether more exciting.

  3. Book-shelf-list

    If you’ve been for a walk in Hoxton, east London recently there’s a good chance you’ve come across One Good Deed Today, a recently-opened shop selling a curated collection of lifestyle and homeware objects. The objects on sale are lovely, but the approach taken by the owners Romain and Alev is even more so – the products are chosen based on how and where they are made, making it a very responsible collection, and five percent of all proceeds from the store are donated to a charity chosen by the customer at the time of purchase. Nice, huh?

  4. Nicer-tuesdays-extra-int-3

    As host Liv Siddall helpfully reiterated last night “we’ve all been children at some point,” so the theme of Childhood is a surprisingly appropriate one for a night of talks from people doing brilliant work in the art and design world. Among the ones who spoke at Nicer Tuesdays last night we heard from Toby Parkin, who is lead curator of the hotly anticipated New Interactive Museum at London’s well-loved Science Museum, comics artist Kev F. Sutherland who has drawn characters for the likes of the Beano, Katie Johnston from Playology and Dean of London College of Communication, Lawrence Zeegen.

  5. Nic-natives-int-list

    What happens when you take five very talented artists and makers, and send them all off together to a a stone barn in the Lake District to draw, make music, write poetry, take photographs and generally spend time exploring together? Beautiful things, that’s what, as Nicolas Burrows (who is one third of brilliant collective Nous Vous) soon found out.

  6. Pacman-int-list

    Prepare your mouse-clicking finger for what might be the best collaboration since Madonna, Britney and Christina Aguilera snogged live on stage – Google Maps has transformed into an interactive and completely playable version of Pac-Man, and it’s bloody brilliant. You can take the yellow-faced protagonist to your local high street, New York’s Time Square, or hop right over to Niagara Falls and run riot in those streets too. Basically, wherever Google can go, you can play.

  7. Serenmorganjones-int-list

    With the centenary of British women receiving the partial vote coming up shortly, artist Seren Morgan Jones decided it was time to focus on the Welsh suffragists who helped to make it happen. “I think it is important to show that there is more to Wales and its history than coal mining, rugby and men,” she explains, “and to draw people’s attention to the fact Welsh women were so involved in the fight for women’s rights.”

  8. Joe-melhuish-int-list

    Idyllic mountainous landscapes are fine and funny domestic settings are good too, but it’s not often we see illustrators tackle the subject of intricately designed custom weaponry. We appreciate Joe Melhuish’s new project all the more for its originality. He first started drawing bizarre pockets knives that look more like the jumbo Super Soakers while researching for a commission for “quite a big pop musician,” and soon became fascinated in the way weapons might grow to become an accessory to one’s identity.

  9. Factory-int-list

    We get sent a lot of cool music-related ephemera at It’s Nice That, from vinyl, CDs and cassette mixtapes to gig posters and flyers, and while we want it to sound fantastic, the music it’s all about isn’t always our first priority. So we thought it would be interesting to speak to somebody firmly at the music end of the spectrum. Namely Jason Carter, the man responsible for setting up BBC Introducing. 

  10. Weekender-list

    If you like art, music, design, illustration, photography or animation you’re not even ready for the bulk of it that’s abut to land on your computer screen like a wet fish onto a ship deck. Are you? You are? Right then. Here it is.

  11. Samchirnside-int-list

    I don’t know what it is about seeing colours up close that’s so mesmerising, but Sam Chirnside is all over it. The Melbourne and New York-based artist works predominantly with oil paints to create strangely beautiful distortions, which work best when overlaid with a band logo to create album artwork, or cut out in geometric shapes. His works resemble planetary compositions straight out of a senior school physics textbook or a happy spillage in an art classroom, and we can’t get enough of them.

  12. Chevalvert-int-list-2

    You wade into Chevalvert’s portfolio rubbing your hands across your eyes, unsure of what you’ve stumbled across. The Paris-based studio was founded in 2007 by Patrick Paleta and Stéphane Buellet and describes itself as being based on an “open, multidisciplinary approach,” which might go some way to explaining why it feels like a cave laden with treasures. So many treasures.

  13. Morganlevy-int-list

    The “commissioned” tab on Colorado-based photographer Morgan Rachel Levy’s website is a pretty diverse place. It spans a project about public schools, a series made in Ferguson following the shooting of Michael Brown and one collection about a map maker for Monocle among others, and nestled happily into the mix is this absolute stonker. 

  14. Sam-coldy-penguin-int-list

    Is it just me or is Penguin killing it at the moment? The publishing house only recently celebrated its 80th birthday by launching a range of its classic titles for 80p each, accompanied by a slick website and a poster campaign which has reached even the furthest corners of London’s transport system. And right now, they’re in the midst of a new campaign called On the Page which celebrates women authors and characters in literary masterpieces.

  15. Hiro-murai-int-list

    If his music videos for the likes of Flying Lotus, St Vincent and Childish Gambino hadn’t already marked him out as one to keep an eye on, Hiro Murai’s latest directorial offering, the music video for Earl Sweatshirt’s new single Grief, should do it. Filmed on a thermal camera and played out in black and white, it’s in the same league as Never Catch Me which stunned us with its simple but incredibly original storyline. In this instance Hiro has taken the level of restraint one step further with a slowed down, monochrome approach – it’s brave, effective and perfectly matched to the pace of the emotive song. Somebody pin him down for a short film, sharpish.

  16. Jg-street-demon-int-list

    Got the mid-week hump-day gloom, friend? Allow me to do away with it for you with a bumper-pack of animated GIFs by the talented hand of illustrator and animator Julian Glander. He once came up with a clever app which transformed colour data into sound for an eight-note synth and made us all into synaesthetes for a day, which was intricate and complicated enough to warrant a dose of fun to follow. A gang of tiny blob men whirling their arms over their heads at impossible speeds? Yes, please. A tiny man on a bicycle riding in tiny circles forevermore? Go on then. Great things are in the pipeline for this master of 3D shapes, bulgy eyeballs and jumping hamburgers. You mark our words.

  17. Gerard-marin-int-list

    There’s something of a trend going around at the moment for identities using 3D logo-marks, and with this one by Gerard Marin we can see why. Barcelona-based designer Gerard developed the branding, stationery and corporate materials for interior designer and visual merchandiser Neus Ortiz. Recognisability and malleability were at the forefront of his mind for this project, and the flexible “N,” which changes according to its application, prove a neat solution to both. His is an unfussy aesthetic which lends itself perfectly to branding projects – here’s hoping more make their way to him very soon.

  18. Ines-cox-int-list

    Scrolling through what feels like an endless array of projects, it’s difficult to believe that Ines Cox only founded her studio last year. Since parting ways with former partner Lauren Grusenmeyer, co-founder of five-year endeavour Cox & Grusenmeyer, Ines has branched out on her own to establish an eponymous practice based in Antwerp. While she still includes much of her old work with Lauren in her portfolio, her new work demonstrates an exciting and playful approach to typography and innovative poster design.

  19. Silent-studios-int-list

    If you were lucky enough to have been at British designer Anya Hindmarch’s SS14 show at London Fashion Week, you’ll have been in for a big surprise. As the models walked coolly up and down the catwalk in Anya’s signature designs the lights slowly began to fall, and a fun electronic musical accompaniment made way for an ethereal swathe of sound. Slowly, a series of giant planetary orbs moved into place above the audience and the bags suspended from the ceiling rose to meet them, while two aerialists swung gracefully from one star to another in a luxurious and otherworldly display of astronomy meeting fashion.

  20. Elcaf-int-list

    The East London Comics and Arts Festival (ELCAF) has just announced its 2015 dates, and after the storming success of last year this year it’s doubling up! Not only is the one day extravaganza growing to fill a full weekend across 20 and 21 June, but it’s also going to be filling two different venues with its trademark workshops and talks, and a new series of masterclasses held in collaboration with the House of Illustration.

  21. Spuren_cover_00-int-list

    Brighten the Corners (the name comes from the Pavement album!) is a design studio split in two – it’s made up of Frank Philippin and Billy Kiosoglou and based in both London and Odenwald, Germany – so it makes sense that it has two bookshelves to show for it, too. The studio’s portfolio of work includes some very impressive stuff for the likes of Anish Kapoor, Frieze, the British Council and the Department of Education, and with fingers in such diverse pies we were keen to see the books Billy and Frank were drawing on for inspiration. So here they are!

  22. Zeloot-int-list-2

    Look at the giant bulbous characters! The boy clamping his hand between his own giant gnashers! The tiny hairy willy floating in mid-air with a bunch of other body parts! This collection could be the work of one woman only and that woman is Eline Van Dam, aka Zeloot, a Dutch illustrator with a taste for the funny, the weird and the generally brilliant. She’s been hard at work of late with a stack of commissions for the likes of Vrij Nederland and The New York Times among others, all of whom are thoroughly enamoured with her unique style. As are we.

  23. Annaginsburg-int-list

    I can imagine that pitching for music videos can be a really interesting process: “Well, we’re going to dress her up in an outfit made of dog treats and hot dog sausages, and have her run around in an underground carpark with two massive Alsatians.”

  24. Barzilai-int-list

    If you’re currently experiencing some love-related dramas allow me to gently suggest you don’t take them to Pauline Barzilaï for sorting. The French illustrator’s new project Les Peines de l’Amour, a sweet illustrated series on rose pink paper, takes a great sledgehammer to tender affairs of the heart, and smashes them all to pieces with a brutally funny satirical edge.

  25. Calm-and-collected-sad-int-list

    About a month ago we stepped off a gloomy grey street in east London and into the rays of an indoor sunshine. At Protein Space in east London a giant orange light was recreating the warmth that emanates from the sun, a steelpan ensemble in the corner was spewing out tropical melodies, and a whole wall plastered in fluorescent illustration and artworks was attracting everybody within a five metre radius, like moths to a printerly flame. The occasion was S.A.D, a weekend exhibition put on by the lads behind Studio Calm & Collected to assuage the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder, brought on by the relentless British winter.

  26. Avblp-ally-capellino-inty-list

    Fashion photographer Agnes Lloyd-Platt’s new lookbook for Ally Capellino’s SS15 campaign is an ode to bathroom dye jobs and co-ordinating your hair with your outfit colour at all times. She paired models with candy-coloured hair in all the best shades – peach, silvery grey, cobalt blue, and mint green – with accessories in corresponding colours.

  27. David-ryle-int-list-2

    It’s rare that mere mortal people can be made to look like superhumans without the aid of some fancy dress, but this series Skihopp (which is Norwegian for ski jump) by photographer David Ryle does it effortlessly. It follows a professional ski jumper as he ascends to the top of an impossibly high structure, pauses for a moment at the top to contemplate what he’s about to undertake, and then jumps, soaring effortlessly through the sky.

  28. Kevin-bacon-int-list

    Every advert that Kevin Bacon has ever starred in has been leading up to this moment – the one where he is cast in a commercial to advertise eggs. Because he is Bacon! So he goes well with eggs!

  29. Julia-kostreva-int-list

    Julia Kostreva Studio is based in California, a fact which seems to go some way to explaining the studios laid back and coolly playful approach to design. Case in point: the identity for “casual intimates” brand SOMI, a nicely pared-back underwear label in San Francisco. The studio developed a palette of soft pinks and exotic blues and greens for the identity, which were then incorporated into a striking logo-mark for the website, packaging and stationery, creating a simple and cohesive overall look for SOMI. Nice!

  30. Allbook_spines-teal-triggs-int

    What a treat we have for you today! The one and only Teal Triggs, professor at London’s Royal College of Art and all-knowing figure in everything concerned with print, graphic design history, self-publishing and feminism, has spent some time digging five of the most influential and inspiring books she owns out of her bottomless collection to share with us.

  31. Ash-thayer-kill-city-int-list-3

    New York City in the early 1990s was dramatically different to how we know it now, if Ash Thayer’s new book Kill City is anything to go by. The Lower East Side was overrun with derelict buildings and dingy corners, and having been kicked out of her Brooklyn apartment Ash came across a welcoming community at a squat called See Skwat. As publisher PowerHouse explains, in that era “squatters took over entire buildings, but these structures were barely habitable. They were overrun with vermin, lacking plumbing, electricity, and even walls, floors, and a roof. Punks and outcasts joined the squatter movement and tackled an epic rebuilding project to create homes for themselves.”

  32. Robin-maddock-gff-int-list-2

    Robin Maddock is currently working in Nigeria – a long old way from Plymouth, which was the setting for his series God Forgotten Face. The project condenses suburban British culture into a collection of curious and familiar photographs, made from the perspective of a photographer who is used to moving around frequently. “I wanted to use a place which I knew well, to show a wider feeling about England,” he explains to us. “My father is from Plymouth, so we visited my grandparents often when growing up in Singapore, and it made a very strong impression on me. All the history, especially the Blitz and its consequent post-war rebuild, speaks strongly about where we came from and what we wanted to be.”

  33. Marta-monteiro-int-list

    Remember Marta Monteiro, whose series of Lilliputian heroines effectively encaptured all of our best Borrower-themed dreams last summer? The illustrator based in Penafiel, Portugal been busy at work since we last checked in, creating all manner of editorial illustrations for the likes of The New York Times and the Washington Post, not to mention some self-initiated projects which have materialised into beautiful books, like Sombras. Her work gives the impression of an illustrator still refining her style, which in her instance is immeasurably exciting, lending her a versatility and an authenticity few manage to successfully pull off. We’re especially enjoying the piece for The Man Who Knew It All, a giant-headed polka-dot dress-wearing lady borrowing the brain of another.

  34. Va-alexander-mcqueen-int-list

    This week saw the opening of the V&A’s much-lauded exhibition of Alexander McQueen’s life’s work, Savage Beauty, a show which attempts to paint McQueen in all of the forms he appeared throughout his career. The experience is almost overwhelming in its presentation of the designer as a visionary, and I left the press view with lists of adjectives covering every available inch of paper I could reach: perverse, sexual, primitive, distorted, gothic, mourning, melancholy. None of them quite seemed to cover it.

    Senior research assistant Kate Bethune worked on the exhibition for around 18 months in the lead up to its opening. “It’s been an absolutely privilege to work on,” she explained to us in a busy corner at the press view yesterday, as the show exhibited in a similar form at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art several years back, there’s a sense that Savage Beauty has now come home. “London was the heart of McQueen’s world,” Kate continued. “He was born here, he was raised in the East End, he attended Central Saint Martins, trained at Savile Row as a tailor and established his fashion label here. It really meant everything to him.”

  35. Brick_01_cover_wizkhalifa-int-list

    There’s no question that BRICK has been the attraction of choice in the It’s Nice That studio this week. Its fluorescent green logotype and Wiz Khalifa’s fixing gaze on the cover combine to act like metal to magpies, and within seconds of picking it up you’ve been drawn in. It might be to a feature in which ex Death Row Records employee Nina Bhadreshwar reflects on her friendship with Tupac, or one where Cam’ron and T.I. discuss staying relevant after 15 years in the game, or editor-in-chief Grant Brydon gets inside the brain of Joey Bada$$. Either way, there’s no putting it down.

  36. Dbg-book-int-list

    We’re huge fans of David Brandon Geeting at It’s Nice That, so news that his work has been immortalised in the form of a gloriously colourful new publication by Pau Wau books was music to our tired ears. Infinite Power is full of his characteristic still lifes, removing everyday objects from common use to make them appear utterly isolated and a bit strange. Copper piping topped with an egg? Check. A fluffy rug paired with a garlic clove? It’s in there. A never-ending hug of extension leads? He’s got that too. David, you complete us.

  37. Ryan-lowry-int-list-2

    There are few out there who have shot Richard Branson posing beside a golden lift for Travel and Leisure, or Tavi Gevinson reclining serenely on her bed for The Great Discontent, which leads us to believe that Ryan Lowry is no ordinary photographer. Splitting his time between Chicago and NYC (although his site specifies that he is available for projects “everywhere in the world… E V E R Y W H E R E”) he’s racked up an incredible roster of clients with his candid, dynamic imagery, including Apartamento, commissioners of all things excellent Bloomberg Businessweek, Vice and Condé Nast, as well as a bunch of others. He seems to be part of a new school of portraiture photographers able to bypass all of the stale sitting about making idle conversation and jump straight to the part where you’re having a really good laugh with your subjects, and his work is all the better for it.

  38. Will-robson-scott-dogs-int-list

    I don’t care how many Tumblrs are littered with pictures of puppies or how many Instagram pugs make their way into my feed, there’s something irresistible about photographs of dogs with their owners. Especially when they look alike. Which having seen this new project from Will Robson-Scott and Ollie Grove, is, I can confirm, a real thing. It happens. They start to resemble one another.

  39. Piece-int-list

    Get ready for more unexpected furniture puns than you’d anticipated seeing this morning, courtesy of a self-initiated project from designers Marcel Häusler (the chap behind this fantastic work) and Regina Pichler. Give Piece a Chance was initially conceived of as a magazine which celebrates ten things each from the two designers’ homes which usually go un-championed – from a stack of magazines to an alarm clock shaped like a chicken – giving them their chance to shine in a simple zine format accompanied by joyous puns. It has since evolved into an online community of people around the world getting involved on their Facebook page, showing off some of the stuff they own and giving their own pieces a chance. A worthy cause!

  40. Neo-neo-int-list

    The last time we wrote about Geneva-based design studio Neo Neo it was to find out a bit more about them and the way they work, in spring of last year. They’ve since amassed a client list populated mainly with arts and cultural establishments – museums, galleries, town halls and the like – creating identities for art festivals, graphic design exhibitions, film festivals and classical music concerts in some of Switzerland’s cultural hotspots.