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Illustration

Graduates 2010: Bryony Quinn

Posted by Will Hudson,

Our final graduate is a bit of a special one. Bryony interned with us during her second year at Camberwell College of Art for a couple of days a week for somewhere near eight months. A constant source of inspiration she would reference and talk about things we felt ashamed not to already know about.

Aside from her wealth of knowledge she creates stunning original drawings that take between 5 and 12 hours to complete, “I usually get a particular image/thing/song/book/quote/idea running round my head for the duration, which then turns into how I recognise each image. Hence the obscure names.”

What did you want to be when you were growing up?

An Oceanographer but sea sickness ruined my fun.

In reflection, how bad was your work in first year?

I had a crippling combination of high standards and low expectations of my work in the first year, but it was only as bad as the time it took for me to get over myself. I started doing a lot of research coupled with internships to help give myself some personal/professional context. Having the freedom and guidance to do that from the get go has been the most valuable part of my education.

If you could show a piece of your folio to one person, what piece would you choose, and who would you show it to?

I would show Joe “The Fall” Kittenger or Ejafjallajokull to Robert Fludd who used a theory of microcosm and macrocosm to explain the cosmos from a universal level to a metaphysical or sub-atomic level. In a questionable imitation of understanding this, these images are drawn using reference from both sides of the spectrum and are meant to present the viewer with ideas of forms they may recognise in a relative big/small way. Or not, but he might humour me.

If you had your own studio or business, who would you share it with and why?

A bookshop with comics compiled by Daniel Clowes and Chris Ware, literature selected by Dave Eggers (whose teachings we shall follow), fitted out by Enzo Mari or a nameless Shaker carpenter with thematic radio provided by Jarvis Cocker. Book bags by Ella Plevin, signage by Simon Memel, web presence from Jordan Chatwin and a dog (Irish Wolfhound).

If you’ve got any left, what will you spend the last of your student loan on?

I’m dressed like it’s perpetually winter so during rush hour thoughts stray to why I didn’t save some moneys for summer clothes.

Where will we find you in 12 months?

51° 31′ 22″ N, 0° 4′ 15″ W – land locked, sad.

Wh-300

Posted by Will Hudson

Will founded It’s Nice That in 2007 and is now director of the company. Once one of the main contributors to the site he has stepped back from writing as the business has expanded. He is a regular guest on the Studio Audience podcast.

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