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Illustration

2010 Review: Marion Deuchars

Posted by Alex Moshakis,

Alongside Margaret Calvert, Marion Deuchars celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the completion of the M1 earlier this year, as part of If You Could Collaborate. Known predominantly for her hand-written work, she is a luminary of the illustration/art world.

Marion’s image of the year: “It was a long drive, we got lost, stuck behind a fruit tractor, the boys were whining in the back seat, but we found it: the ruin of Cortijo del Fraile (The Friar’s Estate). We were on holiday last spring in the Cabo de Gata Natural Park in Almería, Spain, and were determined to visit this spot. The farmstead was the site of the tragic Crime of Nijar, the murder that inspired Lorca to write Bodas de Sangre (Blood Wedding).

Mark out of 10 for 2010?

8

What broke? How did you fix it?

My fitness routine (again). I had a personal trainer, it was all going so well, and then I went on holiday and that broke the routine. I have not fixed it yet, but there is always my ‘New Year Resolution’.

What was the best thing you saw this year?

The Museum of Everything. They have only had 3 shows here but every one a winner. Inspired for years.

What was your favourite day of the year?

Taking my 5 year old to his first day of school. I have two boys, the other is 6. I can’t believe we got to that actual day (so quickly) where they are both at school. I cried, kind of through relief and happiness.

Most dangerous/scariest moment?

Cycling every day in London.

Best Google image search of 2010?

I was researching a project and needed a contemporary picture of Keith Richards from the Rolling Stones. I was trying to find one that was not to ‘scary’. The more I looked, the worse they got. I love you Keith but “photogenic’ does not come to mind.

Best man/woman of the year?

It has to be Ang San Suu Kyi who was released from house arrest in Burma, where she has spent most of the last 15 years.

Your finest moment?

2010 has been a good year, if not memorable, no big ups and no big downs. I was complaining to my husband about this, and he says he likes years like that. I think I need some big event, good or bad to remember it! But…. if I had to think of my finest moment, it is probably taking the plunge to turn down lots of commercial work (not easy when one’s natural instinct is to fit in as much work as possible), to concentrate on a few self-initiated book projects, that are nearly finished!

If you could only take one thing that you bought in 2010 into 2011, what would it be?

Ipad, moleskin, ipad, moleskin, ipad, moleskin, ipad, moleskin……….moleskin wins, it’s real, the ipad can be replaced.

What would you like to say to 2010?

Hello 2011!!! My Scottish background means that Hogmanay is quite a big deal. I have fond memories of pipe bands and cèilidhs to greet the New Year. I always feel incredibly optimistic at the start of the new year. It does not always last, but if I lose that feeling, I’ll be worried.

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Posted by Alex Moshakis

Alex originally joined It’s Nice That as a designer but moved into editorial and oversaw the It’s Nice That magazine from Issue Six (July 2011) to Issue Eight (March 2012) before moving on that summer.

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