• Things_big

    Things

  • Cook1

    Studio Cookbook

  • Cook2

    Studio Cookbook

  • Cook3

    Studio Cookbook

  • Cook4

    Studio Cookbook

  • Cook5

    Studio Cookbook

  • Dionysus1

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Thereisawe

  • Dionysus2

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Espen Friberg

  • Dionysus3

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Viktor Hachmang

  • Dionysus4

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Lindsey Gooden

  • Dionysus5

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Château-vacant

  • Dionysus6

    Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy, Dan Has Potential

  • Eight1

    Eight: Transmission Towers

  • Eight2

    Eight: Transmission Towers

  • Eight3

    Eight: Transmission Towers

  • Eight43

    Eight: Transmission Towers

  • Non4

    Nonamarmi

  • Non

    Nonamarmi

  • Non2

    Nonamarmi

  • Non3

    Nonamarmi

  • Whitereview1

    The White Review

  • Whitereview2

    The White Review

  • Whitereview4

    The White Review

  • Whitereview6

    The White Review

  • Whitereview7

    The White Review

Graphic Design

Things

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

In this weeks Things: Studio Cookbook by Ken Kirton, “coca-cola chicken”; The White Review No.1, “(Un)timely considerations on old and current issues”; Nonamarmi edited by Fabrizio Festa, “I’m Batman Damn It”; Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy by the Panther Club; Eight: Transmission Towers by Theo Simpson and Craig Barker, “pylon… a monumental ancient Eygptian gateway to the sun”. If Ferrero Rocher wrote a Things feature…

The White Review No.1 Benjamin Eastham and Jacques Testard, Editors

Holding The White Review is a pleasure in itself. A bespoke typeface (by art director, Ray O’Meara), beautifully designed, thoughtfully conceived with a conscious definition in worthy content coming from its namesake, La Revue Blanche, which was published at the very end of the 19th century as a political, artistic and literary magazine. TWR fulfills this model in a non-profit, wonderfully extended format with pages filled and designed by London-based writers and artists, “a new generation to express itself unconstrained by form, subject or genre.” Great online content also. Just checked it.
www.thewhitereview.org

Nonamarmi Fabrizio Festa, Editor

The first issue of Nomamarmi has marked itself from the off as “pure at heart” with a suitably apparant ‘made-with-love’ personality. A great still life cover from the emotive Pietro Cocco and a noteworthy super-hero themed interview with britillustrator Jack Teagle, who has also illustrated a nicely titled ‘Almanac of Post-Love’ article. Half Italian, half English – wholly lovely.
www.nonamarmi.com

Studio Cookbook Ken Kirton

A really nicely put together cook book containing a number of collected recipes concocted in the workplace and offered up by various studios and design folk. Contributors include Alex Bettler (Bread Sharing Breadlets), Martino Gamper (Ginger Pasta Asciuta) and Sarah de Bondt (Appeltaart) – which sounds like a dream meal to me. Hato Press printed on appropriately edible looking paper.
www.kenkirton.com
www.hatopress.net

Eight: Transmission Towers Theo Simpson and Craig Barker

Not one to go for an extended quote but this fitting large format, single colour, screenprinted book pays all sorts of design homage to the stucture and space of the huge-and-humble pylon… “a meditation on the architectural vestige of Sir Reginald Blomfield who orchestrated, designed and selected the initial transmission towers for the UK. His vision remained faithful to the original Greek meaning of the word pylon as a monumental ancient Egyptian gateway to the sun”… context fully justifies such a thoughtful piece of print.
www.variouspoints.com

Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstasy Panther Club

The second print series from Panther Club (this time a risographed affair) is as excellently presented as the first, this time with the theme of ritualistic crazytimes – Dionysus: The Madness & Ecstacy. A fast favourite, Espen Friberg, Château-vacant, Dan Has Potential, Lindsey Gooden, Viktor Hachmang and (with a tripstatic illustration) Thereisawe all contribute.
www.pantherclub.eu

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Art View Archive

  1. Main

    In a beautiful profile in The Guardian recently, journalist Tim Lewis travelled out to the Hollywood hills to peek behind the gates of Hockney’s jungle-like home to get a glimpse of what the now 77-year-old artist is up to. As it happened, he had been very busy indeed: making a whole bunch of new paintings that are, in classic Hockney-style, moving in a totally different direction from his previous work.

  2. List

    Remember Kim Keever? Back in the summer of 2013, the New York based artist wowed us with his amazing landscapes created in 200-gallon tanks of water and what’s more, he let us in on his process with some fascinating set-up shots. Now, like many a painter before him, Kim has moved from landscapes to more abstract creations albeit within the context of his sculptural practice.

  3. List

    This project by artist Erica Allen is an oldie but such a goodie. Way back in 2008 California-born, Brooklyn-based Erica decided to merge a collection of faces from found barbershop posters with discarded shots of studio backdrops, creating a series of oddly alluring fictional portraits. Removed from their original context, the freshly-trimmed gents pictured come across as utterly anonymous and strangely distant, connected to one another only by a crisp shape-up and a gaze fixed somewhere in the distance. And if that rainbow backdrop didn’t inspire the album artwork for Drake’s Nothing Was the Same then I don’t know what did.

  4. List

    Edmund Clark is one of the most interesting artists working today, exploring what is arguably the defining issue of the past 13 years. He’s interested in the wars waged by the USA and UK in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as the fall-out from this foreign policy and how it impacts on us here at home. His new book The Mountains of Majeed continues this theme, as it’s a reflection on “the end of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan through photography, found imagery and Taliban poetry.”

  5. List

    The secluded French port of Le Havre is a very particular place. Closed off by barriers, it is staffed solely by men, and jobs there are strictly only passed on from father to son. All of which made it the perfect backdrop for artist JR’s contribution to the Women Are Heroes project, which saw him collaborate with the dockers to create a huge image of a woman’s eyes on a 363-metre long container ship.

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    The bright, woozy haze of Wojciech Fangor’s psychedelic paintings is mesmerising. It’s even more so having learnt that the Polish artist, who worked during the 1960s, created these Op art masterpieces entirely in isolation, working in Eastern Europe having not seen the similar works being created in America and Europe by the likes of Bridget Riley and Victor Vasarely. As such, while the images feel familiar; there’s also something exotic about them, pulsing with light created using intensely coloured oil paint applied in thin layers. A new show named Colour-Light-Space opens next month at London’s 3 Grafton Street gallery, and will display a number of works by Wojciech from the 1960s and 1970s that demonstrate his mastery of all three words in the title. It’s fascinating to think of the artist working on these beautiful optical illusions and explorations of the power of painting well before similar works were created elsewhere in the world, and it’s great to have his work celebrated in the way it deserves.

  7. List

    Mark Lazenby is the go-to guy for collage that just works. We last featured the artist two years ago and since then his portfolio of pieced together artworks has exploded with even more impressive works and a real exploration of materials and collage techniques.

  8. List

    There’s not a pie in the cultural world that James Franco isn’t ready and willing to stick a finger into, and to prove it the actor, director, poet and musician has just announced a new exhibition of his artworks, entitled Fat Squirrel, which is to be held at London’s Siegfried Contemporary gallery. The show is an undeniably eclectic collection, including a number of self portraits of the artist in the guise of various famous historical figures, a deer orgy entitled Triple Team, and some bright painterly collages, not to mention the eponymous overweight rodents which are undoubtedly our favourites.

  9. List

    I’m known for my sweet tooth and ability to consume an obscene amount of cakes, sweets and biscuits in one sitting, so it’ll come as no surprise that I was instantly drawn to Will Cotton’s sugary scenes of candy-laced lands.

  10. List

    Time and again Amy Woodside gets in touch to let us know about new projects she’s cooked up and time and again we’re powerless to resist them. The New York-based artist is focussed to a fault on her fine art practice where iconic letterforms emerge from meticulously registered screen printing and frantic flourishes of spray paint. Where first she caught our eye with multicoloured wordplay, the constant reduction and refinement of her process has resulted in a new series’ of totemic words like ‘Hero’, ‘Cash’, ‘Hoax’ and ‘Like’, pre-loaded with cultural context and double meaning, writ large on the canvas. What’s the meaning behind them? The interpretation is up to you, but Amy always seems to be critiquing pop culture with its own visual vernacular and playing fast and loose with our ambiguous use of language.

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    The Dutch/Brazilian artist Rafaël Rozendaal is best known for his digital artworks that often take the form of webpages but as he told us at our 2013 creative symposium Here he is increasingly interested in exploring his fascination with light and colour in real-world scenarios. Most recently this has taken the form of his hyper-colourful abstract lenticular paintings, which are made up of layers of different frames and so appear to move when viewed from different angles.

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    There’s a wonderful, undulating beauty to Alain Delorme’s series that initially tricks the viewer into thinking they’re seeing flocks of starlings choreographing themselves against iridescent skies. On closer inspection though, rather than capturing mass avian movements the Parisian photographer has replaced them with a myriad of plastic bags.

  13. List

    Way back in 2011 when we first posted the work of Frank Magnotta It’s Nice That was a very different beast – we’d only give you one image to check out and the rest was up to you. So when I stumbled across Frank’s work again this week it seemed essential that we show you a whole lot more. To be honest there have been few updates to his site in the past three years but the work is breathtaking, pulling together pop culture references, architectural precision and some serious Americana and combining it into stark surrealist landscapes. At times grotesque but always engaging, Frank’s graphite artworks are still some of the finest around.