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    Wade Jeffree: Coming To America

Graphic Design

Graphic Design: Aussie designer Wade Jeffree's portfolio is a real visual treat

Posted by Rob Alderson,

There’s not many people we write about on here who I can intro by announcing that I’ve seen their genitals, but wonderfully-named Australian Wade Jeffree is one such creative. The Australian designer is now based in New York city where he works at Sagmeister & Walsh (for whom he stripped down as part one of the studio’s legendary naked promo images). But let’s leave little Wade out of this and focus instead on his other talents.

What’s great about Wade’s portfolio is his versatility, and his sublime confidence dealing with whatever subject matter comes his way. The two projects we’ve chosen to demonstrate this couldn’t be more different. Shift is a booklet he worked on with John Wilson and Steven Lees and aimed “to change the perception of sustainable housing, resulting in the formation of a like-minded community.”

Far on the other side of the spectrum, Coming To America is a photographic and written documentation of the road trip from Nevada to NYC (taking in eight other states as well) which he undertook shortly after arriving in the USA.

Regardless of the projects’ obvious differences, Wade’s surefooted and interesting visual sensibilities are present in both; a good sign of a designer who knows what they want to achieve, and how they want to do it.

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Posted by Rob Alderson

Editor-in-Chief Rob oversees editorial across all three It’s Nice That platforms; online, print and events. He has a background in newspaper journalism and a particular interest in art, advertising and photography. He is the main host of the Studio Audience podcast.

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