• 7

    Votive on tin, 1885 Credit:Museo Nacional de las Intervenciones / INAH

  • 8

    Votive on tin, 1840 Credit:Museo Nacional de las Intervenciones / INAH

  • 9

    Votive on tin, 1862 Credit:Museo Nacional de Historia – INAH

  • 11

    Votive on tin, 1949 Credit:Santuario de San Francisco de Asis de la Diócesis de Matehuala / INAH

  • 14

    Votive on tin, 1943 Credit:Santuario de San Francisco de Asis de la Diócesis de Matehuala / INAH

  • 10

    Votive on tin, 2009 Credit:Santuario de San Francisco de Asis de la Diócesis de Matehuala / INAH

  • 12

    Votive on perforated tin, 1831 Credit:Museo Nacional de Historia – INAH

  • 13

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 5

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 2

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 3

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 1

    These are the images requested by WELLCOME TRUST PRESS OFFICE Delivery note number: 94666 This site will be accessible for the next 26 days. View delivery note Click here to download all images When you download all images you will generate a zip file. If you are using a PC, you will be guided through the unzipping process. If you are using a Mac, drag the images.tar file onto the Stuffit Expander icon to expand the folder. To download individual images or if you have ordered one image click the icon below the selected image. Your contact at Wellcome is Anna Smith ac.smith@wellcome.ac.uk Tel: ++44 (0) 20 7611 8716 C0072614 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072615 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072617 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072618 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072619 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072620 Miracles and Charms, Wellcome Collection Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072623 Felicity Powell Credit:Wellcome Library, London C0072625 Felicity Powell Credit:Wellcome Library, London L0069107 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069108 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069110 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069111 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069112 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069113 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069114 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069115 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069116 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069149 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069152 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069156 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069158 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069171 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069173 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069174 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069187 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069194 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069216 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069226 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford. L0069248 Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 6

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

  • 15

    Amulet from the Lovett Collection Credit:Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford.

Exhibition

What's On: Miracles & Charms

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

The ever-great Wellcome Collection has just opened its doors to its newest exhibitions on the cynicism busting theme of the “magic of faith, hope and chance.” Be you religious or be you not, anyone who does not fall for the incredibly human, gracious stories of drama and deliverance in Infinitas Gracias: Mexican miracle paintings, is obviously undead. Equally moving are the curious and potently personal amulets in the Felicity Powell curated Charmed Life: The solace of objects – the hopers “please” to the votives’ “thank you.”

In 1885, an unfortunate woman went mad. Her husband entrusted himself to the Holy Mary of Solitude of Santa Cruz of Mexico and she was instantly cured. He dedicates a painted votive in gratitude. A victim of ten gangsters also finds reason for thanks and commissions the talents of a local artist to immortalise his moment of reprieve. In these and countless other fascinating renditions of deliverance from disaster or death, the artist carefully paints to order the whole scene from beginning to simultaneous end in graphic detail. Which ever saint that has been implored to help is usually to be found floating omnipotently in the top corners – like a divine light-fitting or an uncanny super hero – they illuminate the scene and give focus to the prayers there after. Most of these ex votos have been lent by the churches of these people and their descendants, and are incredibly moving. Much better then any soap opera. One shows a man who denies that the child his young wife is carrying is his, divine help is called for, given, and the man embraces the child at birth – thanks Mary! Take that Eastenders.

In Charmed Life: The solace of objects, the artist Felicity Powell presents a series of cabinets full of vague taxonomies of “unsung and unseen” charms, collected by Edwardian amateur folklorist, Edward Lovett. “Hope and anxiety is nebulous” Powell said, “and probably doesn’t have a form” – these charms become tangible, external objects of those emotions that the carrier would keep incredibly close, and are therefore powerfully intimate. A rabbit tongue against poverty, peony seeds for incapacity, soldiers mascots, mothers talismans – unlike the Mexican miracle paintings, these are mostly secular and wildly superstitious. Wonderful stuff. The exhibitions will run until February 26, 2011.
www.wellcomecollection.org/miracles-charms

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Exhibition View Archive

  1. List

    It’s not a flawless guide, but you can often tell how significant the subject of an exhibition is based on who writes the foreword in the show’s catalogue. That Milton Glaser contributed an essay for Ivan Chermayeff: Cut and Paste at The De La Warr Pavilion is a good guide that if you’re interested in graphic design, he’s a name with which you should be familiar.

  2. Main10

    It’s so great to see the Nous Vous lads continuing with their quest to bring a gentle spark of inspiration to the general public. Their latest venture is an exhibition in the enormous old factory-turned-cultural centre, The Tetley in Leeds. A Watery Line will exhibit “drawings, prints, paintings and objects, producing new artwork in on-site open studios and working with a selection of other artists to deliver a programme of performances and workshops.” Ahead of the opening of this exciting, friendly show, we asked Nicolas Burrows to tell us a little more about the planning of the exhibition and what they hope the public gets out of it.

  3. List

    Bold printing, toying with scale, subverting nature and confounding the senses seem to be the defining elements of Richard Woods’ work. The artist and designer made a name for himself mimicking wooden patterns in bright colours on the surface of furniture, but his skills extend beyond simple tables and chairs. In his latest show at Albion Barn he’s been given free reign to customise every inch of his exhibition space; the walls, floors and furnishings of an area in which he’s exhibiting a selection of original prints. It’s a pretty bold move to allow an artist to reinvent the entire gallery, but Richard has undertaken the task with characteristic flair, turning the whole environment into a vibrant, cartoonish set in which his work seems entirely at home.

  4. List

    I know what you’re thinking, you’re thinking; “How on earth did that priest train a dolphin to carry him like that?” Or maybe you’re thinking; “Where did the photographer have to stand to capture that image?” Or perhaps, in fact, you’re thinking; “This HAS to be fake.” But all of these lines of inquiry are valid in the world of Joan Fontcuberta, the Spanish artist and photographer who’s latest exhibition has just landed at The Science Museum’s Media Space.

  5. Ws

    It’s not a revelation that festivals of today are not what they used to be. Flower garlands have been replaced with plastic ones that you can buy at Topshop, barely adolescent bands mime where once musicians gave career-changing performances and free loving, all-night dancing sun drenched affairs have morphed into a race to see who can snog a semi-famous TV presenter first. We’re not bitter about it though, especially not when we’ve got photographs like this to remind us of the golden age.

  6. Opinion-list

    This week assistant editor Maisie Skidmore asks what makes a good group show. Are they really all they’re cracked up to be, or are they poised for failure? Tell us what you think of them and which you’ve been to that were especially brilliant or terrible in the comments section below.

  7. List

    There’s a simple, iconic power to the work of Magnus Voll Mathiassen whether he’s immortalising Krautrock legends Kraftwerk or sultry pop princess Rihanna with his trademark crisp lines. His reductive approach to image-making means he’s ideally suited to creating bold work for album covers, but to really appreciate his work it’s best to blow it up MASSSIVE. Which is more or less what he’s done for his new show Hybridio in Oslo, enlarging some of his most iconic work to the size of an actually human man so you can appreciate his skill up close. He’s also showing a selection of hand-drawn work and some incredible watercolours, thereby proving that there’s even more strings to his bow than we’d first thought.

  8. Main6

    I love how Ryan McGinley will just burst on to the scene with a bunch of new work every now and again to remind everyone of his utter greatness. As soon as you see the new shots you realise that while you’ve been peddling backwards at a nine-to-five, Ryan’s been photographing kids jumping into phosphorescence-filled bays, streaking wildly through prairies or lying in meadows of fluff given off by procreating trees. Some people call him a one-trick pony, sure, but it’s pretty obvious that they’re just jealous. At the moment, Ryan’s work is on show at the high-rise Galerie Perrotin in Hong Kong where it seems to hover, hundreds of storeys up, looking down over the city, so go check it out if you’re in the area.

  9. List-

    Opening tomorrow, the Cob Gallery’s new exhibition explores Pastiche, Parody and Piracy in British artwork, exploring the age-old practice of appropriation as a means to explore new ideas. The exhibition has been put together by curator Camilla Ellingsen Webster, satirical cartoonist Jeremy Banx and artist Miriam Elia, partly in response to threats of legal action against Miriam following the realease of her most recent work We Go to the Gallery.

  10. List-2

    With the amount of press attention he’s been getting over the last couple of weeks in the run up to his debut exhibition at London’s Howard Griffin Gallery, you’d think photographer Bob Mazzer would be somewhat overwhelmed. This is not the case. Over the past 45 years he’s been taking photographs of the people he meets on the London Underground, but it wasn’t until Spitalfields Life starting posting them on their blog last year that it all kicked off.

  11. List

    The second year graphic design students on Central Saint Martins’ BA course are about a year ahead of anyone else when it comes to their degree show planning. They’ve already put the wheels in motion to raise vast sums to help launch themselves professionally when they graduate. In order to do so they’ve got a pop-up shop in progress that aims to be the most expensive concept store the world has ever seen. In it they’ll be selling one-off pieces for up to one million pounds, although the more their website is shared through social media channels, the lower the price will get.

  12. Main5

    Arriving at Paradise Row to see the new show by the iconoclastic Eric Yahnker provides a spectacular antidote to the madness of Oxford Street experienced only moments before. Greeted by a sign that reads “We the Peephole,” Eric’s solo UK debut and exhibition of new work boldly critiques the plasticity of pop and the contemporary political landscape: a wonderful relief after walking through a street rife with neon shops like Anne Summers and places that sell plastic fridge magnets of Diana and Robbie Williams.

  13. List

    When you search for “Ian Stevenson” Google suggests that you might be looking for a Canadian psychiatrist who specialised in reincarnation. I wasn’t – I was after the British artist of the same name – but I can’t help wonder what the former might have made of the latter’s work.