Amy

Amy joined It’s Nice That in July 2014 as a freelance editorial assistant. Previously she studied English at Oxford University and has worked at several media and film production companies.

al@itsnicethat.com@amylew27

102 articles
  1. List

    The Daily Nice is one of those online phenomenons that’s been sizzling away in the big internet frying pan since 2004, and this month sees it celebrate its tenth birthday. If you’re not familiar with site (where have you been??), the idea is simple: every day its creator Jason Evans uploads one photograph of something that made him happy. There’s no archive, no social media feeds – just that picture taken by Jason on the site for 24 hours.

  2. Avlist1._alexander_rodchenko_costume_design_for_bedbug_1929__a._a._bakhrushin_state_central_theatre_museum

    For years I ventured no further than the hallowed halls of the lower floors of the V&A. And then, one day, like Lucy and Edmund tiptoeing upstairs to discover Narnia, I crept into the Theatre and Performance Galleries and found another magical wardrobe.

  3. Fllistbompas___parr_organ_front

    It wouldn’t look out of place on the set of a Wes Anderson film or in a Roald Dahl story but believe it or not, the Flavour Conductor exists in our very own world. Magicked into being by the Willy Wonkas’ of the design world, Bompas and Parr, in collaboration with Johnnie Walker Blue Label, it is a musical instrument like no other. This is no ordinary church organ; it’s part of a multi-sensory theatrical experience combining music and imagery to transform the audience’s appreciation of whisky and even make its taste change in their mouth.

  4. Listrobert-ellis_02_750_610

    Series exploring unusual lives are actually not that unusual; however Robert Ellis’ poetic photographs of the New Line community in Ireland stands out with its quiet beauty. This is part of a project about people but – as the scored-out title We are replaced with Where we are suggests – we can learn so much through seeing the place they live in, that we need not even see them.

  5. Thingslist

    Mon dieu! ‘Tis Friday once again and time to collect up all the treats scattered about the studio to show off to you good folks. It’s like the conveyor belt in The Generation Game, except there’s not actually that much to remember and you don’t get to win anything and there are no toasters, hairdryers or shiny saloon cars. Instead, of infinitely more interest, we have a zine, a collection of 100 word stories, a compendium of Andy Rementer’s work, a new Eyeball Comix comic and some delightfully designed city maps. Catch all that? Good, because I’ll be testing you later…

  6. 5.37

    This week’s Studio Audience is packed with more goodies than a Christmas Quality Street tin; we review Alex Chinneck’s ingenious and poetically named floating house installation Take my lightning but don’t steal my thunder and Mike Mellie’s similarly tremendously titled selfie portraits. Maisie tells us what delights she saw at the London Art Book Fair at the weekend and we place bets on the Turner Prize. You can listen using the SoundCloud embed below or you can subscribe via iTunes here.

  7. Listjmp_cg_house_float_10

    Heads are turning in Covent Garden this morning, and they’re not just looking at the usual street performers – they’re gawping at a levitating building. Master of illusions Alex Chinneck’s latest mind-boggling public art installation is on show in what must surely be the spiritual home of his craft; one of the busiest piazzas in London and its theatrical hub. His floating building follows on from a sliding house, upside down house and many other puzzling optical illusions.

  8. Jmlistmexico-jmarigomen-061611-426

    These photographs should carry a warning; they depict such a gloriously idyllic lifestyle they’ll soon have hoards of office workers throwing their suitcases out of nineteenth floor windows and marching, pot plants under arm, to a brighter pastel-shaded future living in slumbering Mexican villages.

  9. Wllistwilam_uk_cover_5_zoom

    What does Little White Lies do best? It talks to the shiniest shimmering stars of the film world about, well, films. And it asks them one question more than any other: what exactly do they love about movies?

  10. 1listphoto-bonjour

    Reading Bonjour is like seeing a beautiful symphony translated onto the page, all bright swirls of colour and twinkles of detail which transport you to a dreamy land. It begins as the birds start to sing and traces the start of an ordinary day but somehow makes it seem oh so very magical. The day arrives as a big beamy sun, glowing in tie-dye neon orange glory, and the plants burst into life looking like fantastical plasticine creations. I could happily gaze at French designer Anne Brugni’s cosmic illustrations for a whole day and float away on her marbled clouds into the speckled sky. Its lyrical charm also owes something to musician and writer McCloud Zicmuse’s storytelling. Kids nourished with books like this are surely guaranteed to become creative geniuses.

  11. Bryanformhals-7list

    Back in 2006, Bryan Formhals was a listless screenwriter-turned-flâneur, wandering the streets of Los Angeles armed with a rangefinder and buoyed by dreams of a film he was never to write. Instead his hours traipsing about Hollwood turned into this photo series, Los Angeles 26, an ethereal study of fleeting moments and contrasts caught on camera.

  12. Main

    Once upon a time, in a farmyard not so far away, Oliver Postgate and Peter Firmin created some of the most iconic characters of early children’s TV. In the Smallfilms studio – a barn and some outbuildings – Bagpuss was born, the Clangers sprung to life and Ivor the Engine first tooted his horn.

  13. Dcgoblin-wrestle_905

    In Dayoung Cho’s illustrated world, it’s the Goblin Olympics and the bunny’s on top. Tumbling top-to-tail with the tiger, it’s cheered on by an amorphous cyclops whilst a duck-billed platypus and rhino await their turn in the ring.

  14. Wzlist

    White Zinfandel is created from a very simple recipe but, like all of the most delectable things, it’s the added touches – the hint of this and dash of that – which make it a chef’s special at the publishing dinner table. Essentially, it’s a magazine about food and culture. It looks at “what happens when creative people, across disciplines and media, get asked to make art about food.” But the sheer complexity of each issue sets it apart.

  15. Peggy-grouplist

    To celebrate the launch of the Autumn issue of Printed Pages, here’s the last of this week’s taster articles. Below you’ll find an excerpt from Maisie Skidmore’s feature on the irrepressible art-world mover and shaker Peggy Guggenheim as well as one of Alice Tye’s delightful commissions. To read the full article you can buy the latest Printed Pages here.

  16. Listemi_ueoka_readings1

    One of my teachers had a pet hate of adverbs and adjectives. “Cut the fluff!” he’d yell after reading our essays. Emi Ueoka’s delicate drawings illustrate his point perfectly; why use more lines when a few create so perfect a picture?

  17. Things1list

    And so it’s Friday once again. The merry-go-round of the weekdays continues and we’re all now riding upon the glittery saddle of the Things pony! We’re taking in the sights and on display is a lovely children’s book, a collection of sartorial memoirs and a bonkers blog-turned-book making a mockery of the 1970s. Keep your eyes big and beedy to spy a book about, well, books and some fine prints too.

  18. List

    We might be one man down but we’re one woman stronger for this week’s Studio Audience. James Cartwright may be guzzling wine and nibbling cheese in France but, you know what, we’re having just as much fun discussing art exhibitions and darstardly good videos right here in the studio. You can listen using the SoundCloud embed below or you can subscribe via iTunes here.

  19. List

    To celebrate the launch of the Autumn issue of Printed Pages, we’ll be giving you a taster of some of the articles all this week. Below you’ll find a short excerpt from our look at the enduring cultural appeal of Americana as well as a couple of images; for the full piece you can buy the latest Printed Pages here.

  20. Blist25.-simon-norfolk_-a-secuirty-guards-booth..._-herat_-2010-2011.-burke_norfolk.-courtesy-simon-norfolk

    Once upon a time, the church spires of New York offered an unrivalled view of the city. But in photographer Berenice Abbott’s Manhattan of the 1930s, skyscrapers shot up on every side and suddenly there were windows and back streets, balconies, construction sites and advertising billboards all crying out for a camera to capture their unique perspective of the metropolis. Changing New York is Abbott’s anatomy of the town, dissecting it, discovering its dramatic angles, dappled shadows and dilapidated dwellings. Her work is a fitting opening for the Barbican Art Gallery’s Constructing Worlds exhibition, exploring architecture and its relationship to the world through more than 250 images from 18 artists.

  21. Lklistshot-07

    To celebrate the launch of the Autumn issue of Printed Pages, we’ll be giving you a taster of some of the articles all this week. Below you’ll find a selection of photographs from the article; to see the full series you can buy the latest Printed Pages here.

  22. Joselistculto-charles-39

    The artist known as José Ja Ja Ja not only creates damnedly detailed drawings and works as Professor of Illustration at the European Design School in Madrid; he also brews beer. Unfortunately, as I have yet to sample SALVAJE, I’ll have to laud the brilliance of his illustrations instead.

  23. Osmalist

    Helsinki’s finest, photographer Osma Harvilahti, shot this campaign for Finnish designers Marimekko in one afternoon. From the photographs it looks like it must’ve been a deliciously dreamy few hours, all cosy cups of tea and crisp breezes ruffling the blinds, but knowing the intense level of aesthetic precision in Osma’s work, behind-the-scenes might’ve smelled less of flowers and more of frazzled nerves. The result, however, is serenity itself.

  24. Sblist

    For his new single New Dorp. New York featuring Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig, SBTRKT released his first animated music video yesterday; a smoky, surreal trip to New York featuring one swaggering, mask-wearing dog. It’s a weird and unsettling trip as we follow this creature stalking through a city that may or may not be New York, and it marks an interesting new visual direction for the artist. We caught up with SBTRKT, director Fons Schiedon and his creative collaborator A Hidden Place.

  25. Stop_depart_13list

    To celebrate the launch of their new Paris-based art direction studio Avant Post, Quentin Berthelot, Johan Mossé and Adrien Weibel created Stop Départ. They worked with photographer Samuel Guigues to make a whole series around the neat motif of the start of an athletics race and so open their studio with a bang. Simple, stylish and well-executed, the theme hints at the studio’s ambition, gunning for gold, and suggests that it’s more than capable of achieving greatness with repeated gilt tones throughout the posters and cards. If they keep producing work of this calibre, we expect to see them on plenty more podiums in the future.

  26. Main

    It can’t be every day that a UK studio gets approached by a leading Russian bank after a brand identity for their new app. So when we heard that NB Studio have created Zhuck, a banking app with a brilliantly satirical edge – an app which actually jeers at the user, goading them into working a bit harder, like a personal trainer who helps you gain pennies instead of losing pounds – we had to learn more. Nick Finney, creative director, answers my questions and reassures me that no smart-phones were harmed in the making of this app.

  27. Main1

    Say welcome, one and all, to Noam Weiner. This Israeli illustrator’s recently ramped up her editorial work, illustrating for several national newspapers and magazines, often with a political or satirical bite. In an illustration for an article on criticism, she cleverly combines a deal with the devil with a hearty dose of mutual back-scratching to make a point about the tangled relationships up the tower of power. We prefer her work at its most minimalistic, when she conveys maximum meaning. Of her older work, the simplicity of her comics version of the classic kids’ adventure book Hasamba is captivating.

  28. 5.35

    Suited and booted we come to you for this week’s Studio Audience, dressed, as Maisie points out, like an awkward family waiting to go to a wedding. (It was our AGM you see, AKA Annual Dress Up For Work Day.) Don’t worry though, we’re our usual barmy selves despite the posh frocks, talking about our bread and butter, art and design. You can listen using the SoundCloud embed below or you can subscribe via iTunes here.

  29. Thingslist

    Quite frankly, I’ve gone mad for mags this week. Once you delve into the world of independent magazines, you realise there are more on offer than your commute could ever possibly be long enough give you time to read them all. Those cherry-picked by yours truly this week explore documentary photography and the photo-essay, (Huck and Aint-Bad ), cruel corporations (Adbusters ) and independent magazines themselves (Gym Class). For a dash of variation and because it was simply too lovely to leave out, a box of charming notebooks printed by French studio L’imprimerie du Marais for your visual delectation.

  30. Gwlist18

    Even if you haven’t seen it, you’ll have heard of it, because Gone With The Wind is still, 75 years after its release, the most successful blockbuster of all time. David O. Selznick’s multi-Oscar winning film has weevilled its way deep into the American – and the world’s – subconscious, creating so vivid a cultural memory we’re almost tricked into believing we lived through it all too. Even a lass like me, “southern” only in the east London sense of the word.

  31. Pepelist09

    Bronia Stewart first caught everyone’s attention back in 2013 with her project Babe Station. With this gritty series taken behind the scenes at an adult television channel the LCC graduate dove into salacious subject matter showing maturity, confidence and creativity beyond her tender years. Where could she and her camera possibly venture next?

  32. Listve-wir3-02

    With the Writers in Residence series, Alain de Botton and Visual Editions sure have hit on an awesome recipe. Take one rather brilliant writer, mix with a mysterious organisation, throw in some tasty design and some crisp photography, and you have yourself one extremely readable publication.

  33. Eslistst-columba's-wells_-londonderry-(derry)-_-n-ireland_-1965-(c)-edwin-smith_-riba-library-photographs-collection

    Edwin Smith’s England is a faraway place, and yet a familiar one. It’s a land inhabited by long-skirted ladies with perms, where brass cash registers are used on high streets fronted by butchers and bakers and grocers. No surprise then that the people’s poet Sir John Betjeman dubbed Smith a “genius at photography” because he has, in his vast collection of photographs of city and countryside, inside and outside, captured the essence of the now-distant England portrayed in the writer’s verse.

  34. Listlachapelle_landscape_03

    The dazzling lights of David LaChapelle’s hyper-realistic photographs, glinting from neon and metallic and shimmering objects, send a hazy glow into the dark background; a magical aura that conjures up memories of fairground rides and bonfire nights and hot breath misting up the air in front of you. The photographer’s images are no less magical really; they draw you in, bedazzled and bewildered, like a ditzy moth drawn to a lamp, and then surprise you by being even more brilliant than you realised at first.

  35. Lalistallenby

    Several years ago, Luke Archer came across an antique camera in his mum’s shed. It was in amongst heaps of equipment from his grandfather’s studio, who was also a photographer, and originally belonged to Alexander Bassano, a Victorian society photographer. Out of this discovery, Inheritance was born; a project about the hereditary peers whose ancestors were pictured by Bassano but also about the portraitist tradition itself.

  36. Thingslist

    Pardon the puns, but when you have a project as eggcentric as 12 dozen egg cups amongst your Things, it’s simply irresistible. If literally hundreds of photos of eggs doesn’t crack you up, perhaps you’ll go all runny inside for a eggcellent poster from Rose Blake and an eggstraordinary comic from the marvellous NoBrow Press and writer and illustrator Roman Muradov. Failing that, you’ll surely get eggcited by Phaidon’s new series of introductions to the life and work of modern masters or by some prints celebrating the eggceptional pioneers of the poster. Right then, onwards, because I’m fresh out of yolks.

  37. Main

    Political, powerful and poignant (although not always all at the same time), Abram Games’ work earned him a place as one of the 20th Century’s most iconic and influential graphic designers. Notoriously, one of his posters was banned by Churchill in post-war Britain and, although he crafted advertising for the Times, Transport for London and Guinness, his most impactful work was created for noble causes. During the Second World War he designed hundreds of recruitment posters and images discouraging waste, with slogans like “Use Spades, Not Ships” and bold dynamic graphics.

  38. Listrop.8991_4

    New York-based visual artist Roxy Paine has achieved the mind-boggling feat of recreating an entire airport security checkpoint out of wood. This follows on from the mysteriously named Machine of Indeterminacy and Scrutiny and takes his maple masterpieces to a new degree of complexity. Sadly, he declined to tell me just how many trees went into the making of Checkpoint, which is part of his solo exhibition Denuded Lens at the Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York, but he has answered a few more sensible questions about just how he creates his crazily intricate works which explore “the discourse of the diorama.”

  39. Andrealist

    Sometimes the simplest things can be the hardest to pull off, but that is precisely what Andrea Evangelista’s graphic design achieves with quiet aplomb. I imagine most young creatives would quail at the notion of designing a book titled Trafficking Survivor Care Standards, but Andrea’s work is confident and careful, lending the text the clarity it demands. He lets the content sit in plenty of white space inside its buttercup cover, resisting the temptation to chuck in a bunch of pretty images.

  40. Thomas

    If I were to draw my own picture of Thomas Colligan (having never met the talented chap) I’d attach a little funnel to his back, because the man is a veritable illustration engine, churning out heaps of great work just this year. This impression also owes something to the plethora of cars and factories and engines puffing out plumes of smoke in the busy worlds of his illustrations, where a population of Flat Stanley-like characters tootle about. Alternating between gouache and coloured pencils, Thomas creates scenes with grass as green as the Swiss hillsides he hails from, and balaclava-clad bank robbers as gutsy as those in the movies set in his new home of New York.