Photography Archive

  1. Tomas_werner_dolphins-int-list

    When Tim Berners Lee invented the internet, surely, SURELY he had images like these in mind. Perhaps he had loftier aims, but today this is the sort of thing we’re really after online: pictures of a small, cute, fluffy dog, sitting on things we don’t expect, shot beautifully. The man behind these images is Slovakian photographer Tomas Werner, who took more than 100 pictures of the little Pomeranian in Miami, which have now been drawn together in a book called A Handbook for Dog Walkers published by Gost.

  2. Laurel-golio-dancexplosion-int-list

    After Little Miss Sunshine I feel like the world of American pageantry is something I understand implicitly. Young girls travel the country with their drug-addled grandparents, suicidal uncles and mute brothers desperate to prove their worth as dancers, cheerleaders, singers and acrobats. I assumed that Laurel Golio’s series of photographs at Dance Xplosion might dispel these cinematic myths but it seems this is a fiercely competitive world of high drama and emotion. Laurel’s photos show just how much these kids, as well as their parents, are focussed on success, twerking, tapping and tangoing their way to middle American superstardom.

  3. Andreaslaszlokonrath-neilpatrickharris-int-list

    Photographer Andreas Laszlo Konrath hasn’t been on the site for far too long but there’s two good reasons to rectify that now. Firstly he’s just shot Josh Brolin for the new-look, newly biannual Port magazine and secondly because this year marks a decade since he upped sticks and moved to New York. Andreas has a diverse practice that flits between self-initiated projects and commissioned portraits and he’s equally confident working in either milieu. We’ve decided to focus on his celebrity shots here and his Port covers (both Josh Brolin and Sam Rockwell) are good places to start. There’s something unflinchingly intimate about the eye contact Andreas often captures (see also Ewan McGregor, Kendrick Lamar and a half-naked Neil Patrick Harris) but he’s no one-trick pony, and from Bryan Cranston peering into the middle distance to the top of David Byrne’s head, he has a real talent for making us feel connected to these stars in a very visceral way.

  4. Morganlevy-int-list

    The “commissioned” tab on Colorado-based photographer Morgan Rachel Levy’s website is a pretty diverse place. It spans a project about public schools, a series made in Ferguson following the shooting of Michael Brown and one collection about a map maker for Monocle among others, and nestled happily into the mix is this absolute stonker. 

  5. Farah-al-qasimi-int-list

    Photographer Farah Al Qasimi lives and works between Dubai and New York; her series The World Is Sinking depicts the areas of Dubai that prosperity forgets, all decayed McDonalds signs and bright murals surrounded by detritus. They’re great, I’m not sure if Farah uses high-saturation film or if Dubai is just consistently this sweet shade of saccharin – either way, I’m into it. She captures sand sculptures, bins and empty foyers with real aplomb. Farah graduated from Yale in 2012, and has since exhibited at Fotofest Abu Dhabi, New Yorks School of Visual Arts and the Meridian Art Center in Washington DC.

  6. List

    British photographer Carl Bigmore is living out a childhood obsession with the USA. The Londoner has just rounded off a project called Between Two Mysteries that’s seen him trawling the Pacific Northwest documenting the daily lives of its inhabitants; using personal pop culture references to contextualise the people he meets. “Since settlers followed the perilous Oregon Trail in search of prosperity in the 1800s,” he says, “the American imagination has left its imprint on the landscape. Oregon is forever haunted by the Overlook Hotel in Kubrick’s The Shining and its chilling analysis of the nation’s conflicted soul.”

  7. Gilesduley-legacyofwar-int-list

    A few months ago I had a beer with Giles Duley and conversation turned to what he was up to work-wise. He was relaxed, breezy even, when he told me he was hoping to launch a multi-faceted, multi-platform exploration of the ongoing effects of conflicts after they’ve supposedly ended. It sounded insanely ambitious; it also made whatever my professional plans were at the time seem pathetically puny. But on Friday, Giles’ project Legacy of War became a reality as it reached its £20,000 Kickstarter goal.

  8. Ohpearch-id-4-int_copy

    While casually knocking out impressive videos for Jungle, Oliver Hadlee Pearch has also been building up a fine portfolio of editorial photography. There’s a great atmosphere to his work; humour, poise and the impression that Oliver and his models have their tongues firmly in their cheeks. Even while performing incredible feats of synchronised dancing and photographing golden babes amongst Memphis furniture there’s an enviable sense of ease to his work, or rather confidence in the set-ups and their outcome. It’s refreshing to see someone with such a singular aesthetic running with it, and maintaining it so successfully.

  9. Avblp-ally-capellino-inty-list

    Fashion photographer Agnes Lloyd-Platt’s new lookbook for Ally Capellino’s SS15 campaign is an ode to bathroom dye jobs and co-ordinating your hair with your outfit colour at all times. She paired models with candy-coloured hair in all the best shades – peach, silvery grey, cobalt blue, and mint green – with accessories in corresponding colours.

  10. David-ryle-int-list-2

    It’s rare that mere mortal people can be made to look like superhumans without the aid of some fancy dress, but this series Skihopp (which is Norwegian for ski jump) by photographer David Ryle does it effortlessly. It follows a professional ski jumper as he ascends to the top of an impossibly high structure, pauses for a moment at the top to contemplate what he’s about to undertake, and then jumps, soaring effortlessly through the sky.

  11. Claudialegge-int-2

    Just off the coast of Cancun there is an area of ocean floor that has been transformed into a mysterious sculpture park. Aside from the occasional tourist and bull shark, it’s pretty deserted but for the stone figures scattered in the white sand, placed there by artist Jason deCaires Taylor back in 2009. Claudia Legge, a London-based photographer with a passion/addiction for shooting underwater, found out about this creepy tranquil sculpture park when she was in Mexico and wasted no time in getting below the surface with her camera to check it out. We spoke to her about the pretty breathtaking results of her dive, and the technical difficulties of doing such a shoot.

  12. Sophie-green-a-day-at-the-races-int-list

    “Rain, more rain, drunk people, high people, drum ’n bass, dodgy hair, flat caps, tattoos, gold chains, piercings, sun shine, tank tops, topless chests, slush puppies, hot dogs, chips, chicks, fast cars, pimped out cars, racer boy heaven…”

  13. Ash-thayer-kill-city-int-list-3

    New York City in the early 1990s was dramatically different to how we know it now, if Ash Thayer’s new book Kill City is anything to go by. The Lower East Side was overrun with derelict buildings and dingy corners, and having been kicked out of her Brooklyn apartment Ash came across a welcoming community at a squat called See Skwat. As publisher PowerHouse explains, in that era “squatters took over entire buildings, but these structures were barely habitable. They were overrun with vermin, lacking plumbing, electricity, and even walls, floors, and a roof. Punks and outcasts joined the squatter movement and tackled an epic rebuilding project to create homes for themselves.”

  14. Robin-maddock-gff-int-list-2

    Robin Maddock is currently working in Nigeria – a long old way from Plymouth, which was the setting for his series God Forgotten Face. The project condenses suburban British culture into a collection of curious and familiar photographs, made from the perspective of a photographer who is used to moving around frequently. “I wanted to use a place which I knew well, to show a wider feeling about England,” he explains to us. “My father is from Plymouth, so we visited my grandparents often when growing up in Singapore, and it made a very strong impression on me. All the history, especially the Blitz and its consequent post-war rebuild, speaks strongly about where we came from and what we wanted to be.”

  15. Laboratoryperfumes_l_kf_tonka-lr-int-list

    Fabulous photography, super set design and stunning scents. We’re starting to sound like a husky, sensual M&S advert. So before we delve into any more sensuous nonsense, we present a beautiful combination of all three of the aforementioned beauties: this gorgeous campaign for Laboratory Perfumes, entitled Imagining the Invisible. The images accompany the launch of the brand’s series The Lab, a range of “creative experiments in scent,” which look to the visual world to articulate how bloody lovely their perfumes are. These are shown on The Lab website, in images created by set design duo Lightning + Kinglyface (Anna Fulmine and Victoria Shahrokh, to the taxman), and photographed by Kate Jackling.

  16. Dbg-book-int-list

    We’re huge fans of David Brandon Geeting at It’s Nice That, so news that his work has been immortalised in the form of a gloriously colourful new publication by Pau Wau books was music to our tired ears. Infinite Power is full of his characteristic still lifes, removing everyday objects from common use to make them appear utterly isolated and a bit strange. Copper piping topped with an egg? Check. A fluffy rug paired with a garlic clove? It’s in there. A never-ending hug of extension leads? He’s got that too. David, you complete us.

  17. Ryan-lowry-int-list-2

    There are few out there who have shot Richard Branson posing beside a golden lift for Travel and Leisure, or Tavi Gevinson reclining serenely on her bed for The Great Discontent, which leads us to believe that Ryan Lowry is no ordinary photographer. Splitting his time between Chicago and NYC (although his site specifies that he is available for projects “everywhere in the world… E V E R Y W H E R E”) he’s racked up an incredible roster of clients with his candid, dynamic imagery, including Apartamento, commissioners of all things excellent Bloomberg Businessweek, Vice and Condé Nast, as well as a bunch of others. He seems to be part of a new school of portraiture photographers able to bypass all of the stale sitting about making idle conversation and jump straight to the part where you’re having a really good laugh with your subjects, and his work is all the better for it.

  18. Will-robson-scott-dogs-int-list

    I don’t care how many Tumblrs are littered with pictures of puppies or how many Instagram pugs make their way into my feed, there’s something irresistible about photographs of dogs with their owners. Especially when they look alike. Which having seen this new project from Will Robson-Scott and Ollie Grove, is, I can confirm, a real thing. It happens. They start to resemble one another.

  19. Ewen-spencer-int-list-new

    To describe Ewen Spencer as anything less than a pillar of British counterculture would be to do him an extreme disservice. Having served stints at iconic magazines The Face and Sleazenation in the 1990s he has since watched the rise and fall of UK garage, documented the grittiest corners of grime, shot teenagers partying in Napoli and Ayia Napa and caught the best of European styling which has made its way over to Miami. He actually told us about some of it at our Here conference last year, and if you’re interested you can watch the full talk here.

  20. Aishazeijpveld-whatremains-int-list

    Aisha Zeijpveld likes to toy with the viewer. She once overheard two girls discussing her work at a show, with one of them solemnly declaring that her photographs are “definitely Photoshopped.” In fact for the most part they’re not, but Aisha is an image-maker who enjoys confusing us as to what we think we’re seeing. Take her What Remains series from a couple of years ago that was inspired by Egon Schiele’s sketches and created alongside set designers Sara Ivanyi and Judith Veenendaal.

  21. Joejohnson-reno-3-int_copy

    Joe Johnson’s photo-essay The Playing Field documents Reno’s casinos in their spectacular neon glory, but completely empty. The interior architecture designed to delight, confuse and distract looks even more absurd deserted than when it’s packed with OAPs drinking Screwdrivers. Almost every surface is reflective and disorientating; those that aren’t project mountain-top lakes and seascapes.

  22. Eudes-de-santana-int-list

    Eudes de Santana’s photographic portfolio is almost suspiciously international. He has worked on commissions in London, Berlin, Cape Town and Barcelona as well as his home country of Brazil, piecing together a collection of images which are compelling and energetic, but which might lead you to believe he’s on a career-long holiday rather than busily working. On the contrary, it’s just that his clients – Zeit Magazine, Vice, Nike and Sony are known all over the world, giving him more-than-legit cause to travel to wherever the work is. And can you blame him?

  23. Larry-clark-int-list-2

    There are dream collaborations, and then there are those that seem to good to be true but happen anyway, which is probably the category we’d pop Larry Clark and J.W. Anderson in. The pair have gotten together to create a new book entitled The Smell of Us, which features the cast of Larry’s new film (of the same name) running riot around Paris, hanging out in hotel rooms in their pants and generally having the time of their lives, in a host of J.W. Anderson creations. Anderson’s stripy 1960s details give a happily retro vibe to Larry’s compositions, thrusting the cast into an era which reeks of greasy hair, fumbling encounters round the back of the Palais de Tokyo and that conspicuous trail of baccy in jeans back pockets.

  24. Garywallis-mcqueen-int-list

    There’s a wave of adoration sweeping across London for Alexander McQueen at the moment, almost exactly five years after his untimely death in 2010, and it feels something like a homecoming. This is due in no small part to the upcoming showing of Savage Beauty, an exhibition of his life’s work which was first seen at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art four years ago, and which will open at the V&A on 14 March with a wealth of new exhibits.

  25. Euan-int-main

    Before I begin can I just say that what you see in these photos is not LARP (Live Action Role Play), it’s SCA which stands for The Society for Creative Anachronism. The difference is where LARP is more playful, going out with your mates wearing costumes and wearing padding and bashing each other on the head, SCA is actually recreating aspects of primarily Medieval history down to the smallest detail in trams of craftsmanship. A bit like a theatrical production, but with jousting.

  26. Caitoppermann-bangkok-int-list-2

    Sifting through holiday snaps is generally a pleasure – all that sniggering at old men in questionable swimming trunks and cooing over exotic birdlife – but this enjoyment is at least 80% greater when the traveller is a photographer, and 10% more again when it’s Cait Oppermann. The Brooklyn-based image-maker has an observing eye which allows her to pick up on the details others might miss – like odd happenings at a US sex convention, for example, or a mirrored ceiling in a derelict shopping mall and she found Bangkok to be in no short supply of such interesting corners.

  27. Stefaniemoshammer-int-main

    “Las Vegas is the strip club capital of the world,” says Stefanie Moshammer, an Austrian photographer whose recent project led her to the underbelly of Nevada’s shimmering city. Stefanie began work on a series called Vegas and She, in which she documents strippers, nightclubs, and various bits and bobs that represent Las Vegas culture: bright pink limos, dust trails, palm trees, and diving boards into sapphire pools.

  28. Neilbedfordgsj-classicfootballshirts-int-list

    All football fans have a fetishistic relationship with the shirts that runs deeper than simple affirmations of tribal loyalty. We obsess over the exact shades of colours, the detailing on the cuffs, and the stitching on the crest – and most of us can vividly remember how certain shirts smelled (is this getting weird?). Anyway a new project from the chaps over at The Green Soccer Journal celebrates this relationship between fan and jersey in a new series of photos shot by their long-term collaborator Neil Bedford. Occasionally we glimpse a club name or badge but this is more universal than that and the close-ups in particular speak to the intensity of our addictions.

  29. Andreaalquati-fukushima-3-int_copy

    Andrea Bonisoli Alquati has been researching and photographing the ecological effects of nuclear disasters since 2007. First, he was doing so in Chernobyl and since 2012 he’s photographed in Fukushima’s exclusion zone, where as part of his PhD research he assesses the health and condition of individual animals, populations and community dynamics in the area.

  30. Gaeanwoods-int-main

    Gaea Woods caught our eye the other day with the portraits she took of her friend Samantha, seemingly covered all over in Vaseline. A bit of research led us to finding out that Gaea is actually a photographer with a whole host of talents under her belt, particularly when it comes to shooting things really close-up. Gaea was born in rural northern California and now resides in LA, where she’s making her career as a photographer.

  31. Wailin-editorial-7-int_copy

    Photographer Wai Lin Tse’s portfolio balances dewy, sun-kissed babes with photographs of plants and chubby-cheeked kids. It’s quite the melting pot and can be seen in editorials for Lula, The Plant and Apartamento magazine. Lin’s photographs are impeccably-lit and somehow both poised and quite tongue-in-cheek. She seems equally comfortable shooting landscapes as she is people, perhaps partially down to the fact that she is based in both Stockholm and Barcelona and surely taking lots of exciting cross-continent road trips.

  32. _thom-atkinson-guy-the-gorilla_-natural-history-museum-int-list

    Removed from their cabinets, museum pieces take on a strange quality. Once the glass is gone, some of their mystique goes too; and they feel almost like everyday things to be used and touched, rather than alien relics to be admired. It’s this disorientating new quality that’s captured so beautifully in Thom Atkinson’s series Museums, showing pieces from the Wellcome Trust and National History Museum collections.

  33. List-adrian_skenderovic_down_the_river-15

    There’s something very peaceful, but slightly voyeuristic about Adrian Skenderovic’s series Down the River. The photographs show the bateaux-mouches tourist boats that gently cruise down the River Seine in Paris, but here the spectacle isn’t the Louvre or Notre Dame, but the tourists themselves. It really awakens our nosey nature seeing the little bald heads and bathing ladies from above, and creating our own narratives about what might be happening on these seemingly serene vessels, with the colours and perspective helping us float along with the subjects. Last time we posted about Adrian’s work it was to showcase his brilliant series of images of lonely basketball hoops, and it seems he has a knack for taking objects that feel familiar and totally shifting our take on them.

  34. Boyhood-interview-2-int_copy

    In case you’ve been living under a rock for the last 25 years, and missed last night’s Oscars ceremony (congratulations Patricia!) Richard Linklater is an Austin-based filmmaker who until recently would have been best-known for coming of age classic Dazed and Confused, the Before trilogy or School of Rock. That is, until the release of Boyhood.

  35. Yenertorun-int-list

    Yener Torun is a 32 year-old architect who has turned Istanbul into the geographical equivalent of Aladdin’s cave of wonders. Tucked away among the beautiful Ottoman and Byzantine architecture and the blue Bosphorus are a wealth of impossibly bright buildings dominated by geometric patterns, rainbow hues and funny architectural idiosyncrasies. And through his Instagram account, Yener has been slowly but steadily documenting it all.

  36. Charlotterutherford-fashed-4-int

    Charlotte Rutherford’s photography is fun, bright and tinged with humour and 1980s sass. Shooting editorial for the likes of Vice and Tank magazine and look-books for Lazy Oaf and Baby G, the self-taught photographer maintains an aesthetic that is both well-informed and original. She cites David LaChapelle and Pierre et Gilles as major influences on her work, saying that they prove the encouraging dictum “OK cool, you can do like ANYTHING.” I couldn’t agree more.

  37. Hipgnosis-portraits-p193-int-list

    You can almost smell the creativity, hash and late late nights behind the images in Hipgnosis Portraits. Or perhaps that’s just the super-shiny, huge full-colour pages. Either way, the enormous tome from Thames & Hudson transports you into a world of surreal scenes formed of surreal characters, taking us into the archives of the Hipgnosis design agency that helped form the mythologies surrounding some of the biggest names in music in the 20th Century.

  38. Labadie-van-tour-pool-intlist

    Few things look quite as fun as floating about in a big blue pool, surrounded by those foam wiggly things right now. The moustachioed gent above, reclining in the water, was shot as part of photographic duo Labadie / Van Tour’s Pool series for a Vers Beton magazine feature about Rotterdam’s public swimming pools.

  39. Bgm-int-list

    Blair Getz Mezibov is the photographer responsible for taking men, mere mortal men, and transforming them into what are essenetially demi-gods. Case in point, here’s some of his refined editorial work for glossy magazines like GQ Style, Rollacoaster magazine and Out magazine, elevating models to immaculately poised and dapper gents caught mid-swing in a game of tennis, or perhaps leaning nonchalantly over the back of a director’s chair, looking like they’ve been carved from marble.

  40. Izumimiyazaki-main-int

    Life can be pretty boring when you’re a teenager. Rather than turning to the gory allure of video games and SnapChat, 18-year-old Izumi Miyazaki decided to take matters into her own hands and make a series of selfies that make yours look absolutely rubbish. By utilising household items and foodstuffs as props, and sometimes going as far as building her own sets (see head in the clouds photos below) Izumi transports herself into far off lands, so far off that they’re on a different world entirely. Her fixed, deadpan stare throughout makes the project not just endearing but also worth much more than if she was just larking about. It’s art, man. FYI she also sells badges and other small merch items – get ’em while you can.