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    Bryony nicked the camera, so this week I teamed up with Jamie McIntrye (our intern) and our scanner to supply images

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    Der Grief (best cover)

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    Der Grief

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    Der Grief

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    Der Grief

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    Stuff by Hattie Stewart

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    Stuff by Hattie Stewart (including Thunderbirds stamp)

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    Stuff by Hattie Stewart

  • Get_into

    Go Into Town & Get Some Milk

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    Go Into Town & Get Some Milk

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    Go Into Town & Get Some Milk

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    Plausible Possible

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    Plausible Possible

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    Plausible Possible

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    Sci-Fi Lovers

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    Sci-Fi Lovers

Graphic Design

Things

Posted by Alex Moshakis,

Bryony is currently manning our Pick Me Up stall, so I’ve been tasked with bringing you the weekly dose of Things (which includes super cool stuff, pretty much as always)…

Der Grief Simon Karlstetter, Leon Kirchlechner and Felix von Scheffer

The latest issue of Der Grief officially features one of the best magazine cover images of 2011. Thankfully, the rest of the magazine – which contains more photography as well as poetry and stories – is as good (and sometimes as equally amusing) as the cover in which its bound. Also, there’s an incredibly weird but kind of cool editorial letter in the magazine’s first few pages, highlighting the importance of laughter. I’d like to second that – laughter is important. I’d also like to stress how important it is to generally avoid speeding objects, and to share food sometimes.
www.dergreif-online.de

Stuff by Hattie Stewart Hattie Stewart

We sometimes receive bumper packs through the post. The packs don’t contain one thing, but instead house many, many different things. This week’s comes courtesy of Hattie Stewart, who sent in two zines, a sticker, and a super nice business card (all varying in size). As stand-alone objects they each work – they’re all as individually important as the next – but collectively they shout out load, grab hold of your attention and very nearly don’t let go. Also, she used a Thunderbirds stamp (see picture). Cool!!!
www.hattiestewart.blogspot.com

Go Into Town & Get Some Milk Caitlin Duennebir, Rabitt Books

Published by Rabbitt Books, Go Into Town & Get Some Milk is a small and wonderfully concise collection of images by photographer Caitlin Duennebir. A highlight is the book’s front page, which instead of a photograph features a poem that is perhaps intended to shed light on the series or else is meant as a weirdly abstract but nevertheless highly intriguing introduction to the book. The poem reads:

I’m sitting on the
back porch watching
people run up and
down the hill.
They should run because
at night that is where
all the skeletons go
to dance.
www.caitlinduennebier.co.uk
www.rabbitt.eu

Plausible Possible Alexandre Elmir, Gregoire Alix-Tabeling, Yoan Ollivier

According to their website, Plausible Possible (consisting of Alexandre Elmir, Gregoire Alix-Tabeling, Yoan Ollivier) is a “design agency that supports the development of private or public initiatives.” This featured piece of newsprint is their manifesto (of sorts) – an introduction to their philosophy and an articulate comment on what design really means.
www.plausiblepossible.com

Sci-Fi Lovers James Jessiman

London-based printmaker and illustrator James Jessiman sent us a print titled Sci-Fi Lovers or Sci-Fi Lovers 2011. It’s totally weird (it features a surreal act of marriage proposal in a psychedelic, fluorescent flower-covered room), but more importantly is completely representative of the craft and ability evident throughout all of Jessiman’s work.
www.jamesjessiman.com

Portrait8

Posted by Alex Moshakis

Alex originally joined It’s Nice That as a designer but moved into editorial and oversaw the It’s Nice That magazine from Issue Six (July 2011) to Issue Eight (March 2012) before moving on that summer.

Most Recent: Art View Archive

  1. List

    Have you ever wondered what the world might have looked like after the great Old Testament flood? What bizarre events might have followed such a freak occurrence in weather? Me neither. It’s honestly never crossed my mind. But illustrator Samuel Branton has been fixating on the idea, imagining the strange fusion of land and sea that a tumultuous rise in water levels might effect. He’s gone one step further and illustrated these fictional scenarios in miniature, taking this Regency medium and making it weird. Witness crabs beating up a wild boar, monkeys tossing an elephant in the air and a sad old sperm whale incapacitated in a tree. And Deluge is available in book form too!

  2. Aakash-itsnicethat-list

    When we last wrote about Aakash Nihalani we described his practice as a series of interventions, and now that he has graduated from playful street art compositions to full blown technological mind-blowers, that vaguery seems even more apt. His newest piece sees him create a series of interactive installations which respond to the movements of the subject stood in front of them. The video demonstrates it better than I could ever hope to, so wrap your eyes around it and try to keep your jaw off the floor. Aakash is entering a new age, people; just imagine the possibilities!

  3. Ines-longevial-itsnicethat-list

    Inès Longevial is an art director and illustrator based in Paris, whose beautiful paintings of intertwined bodies are likely to have you looking twice. She breaks up the human figure into segments in a fashion Picasso himself would admire, rendering different parts in contrasting but muted colour palettes to disguise the physicality of her subjects. The effect is quite beguiling; hands play across hips and colour distinctions hint at the seams of clothes, but nothing is clear cut. It’s a geometric play on anatomy, and it has clients including fashion brand Amélie Pichard and sportswear giants Nike coming back for more.

  4. Hannahwaldron-itsnicethat-list

    “I wish I knew how to weave,” I found myself sighing longingly while clicking through Hannah Waldron’s portfolio. The UK-based multi-disciplinary artist and designer has transitioned seamlessly from grid-based image-making to create works in textile form since completing an MFA in Textiles at Konstfack, Sweden, and it looks like she’s well at home in the medium. Map Tapestries is a series of woven works inspired by various city scenes – Kreuzberg, NYC and Venice, for example – in bright colours, evocative shapes and simple geometric forms, and it’s wonderful.

  5. Jen-stark-whirl-side-int-10

    If it isn’t broke then there’s absolutely no need to even think about fixing it, as artist Jen Stark is fully aware, and there’s nothing broken about her geometric papercut sculptures. The LA-based artist has been making such work for literally as long as It’s Nice That has been running – here’s the first time we ever posted about her, back in 2007 – and although her work continues to grow in intricacy, she’s stayed true to her roots. These days her sculptures are made more and more often inside huge, unassuming black and white boxes, recreating the feeling that you’re a child about to unbundle a giant parcel of joy on Christmas morning, and they’re still as impressive as they were eight years ago.

  6. Everybody-razzle-dazzle-1-photo-mark-mcnulty-int-list

    Sir Peter Blake has designed this fabulous dazzle ship, a Mersey Ferry that will carry commuter passengers for the next two years. Named Everybody Razzle Dazzle, Sir Peter says it’s his “largest artwork to date,” and that he was “honoured and excited to have been asked to design a dazzle image for the iconic Mersey Ferry.”

  7. Boyocollage-int-list

    Some budding young design talents fresh out of university might harbour resentment about being thrust into a new job at a design studio as a “photocopier boy” (his words), but Patrick Waugh is not one of them. Instead he took full advantage of the rich archive at his disposal in his earliest and most junior jobs to make copies. Lots of them. And then took a scalpel and some masking tape to them, and transformed them into something altogether more exciting.

  8. Stephenabela-int-main

    At first, Stephen Abela’s images are all glorious bronzed bodies, sun-drenched beaches and hazy holiday reveries. But beneath the heat, there’s something else at play too, which feels a little more disquieting. In that oft-cited Edward Hopper thing: even in the densely populated scenes there feels like there’s a loneliness. Even the speech bubbles are lonely – in fact, they’re vacant – suggesting that for all the beautiful scenery, the folk that populate it aren’t quite sure what to say or what to do. There’s a joy there, for sure, but the great thing about Stephen’s work is this complexity, and the sense that all isn’t necessarily as it seems.

  9. Int-list-carsten-holler-pic

    Merging the fun of the playground with the beauty and cerebral qualities of art, a slide will transport visitors to the Hayward Gallery entrance this summer thanks to the forthcoming Carsten Höller show, Decision.

  10. Traceyemin-mybed-int-

    Sometimes I don’t really “get” modern art, but I get Tracey Emin’s My Bed. She displayed it as a piece of art in 1998 after practically living in it for about a month following a bad breakup. Back then she was rake-thin and impish with an appetite for booze and fags, in that odd age where you’re left to fend for yourself but are not perhaps quite ready.

  11. Serenmorganjones-int-list

    With the centenary of British women receiving the partial vote coming up shortly, artist Seren Morgan Jones decided it was time to focus on the Welsh suffragists who helped to make it happen. “I think it is important to show that there is more to Wales and its history than coal mining, rugby and men,” she explains, “and to draw people’s attention to the fact Welsh women were so involved in the fight for women’s rights.”

  12. List-welcome_to_neu_friedenwald_by-laura-jung

    To say that the announcement from David Lynch that Twin Peaks was returning was met with excitement is something of an understatement. It was, as is to be expected, met with rabid levels of hysteria – or at least as rabid as those cool enough to adore the show would willingly articulate – and we’re still a good year away from seeing it on screen. This year is the show’s 25-year anniversary, and to mark the occasion, something very special is afoot in Berlin.

  13. Samchirnside-int-list

    I don’t know what it is about seeing colours up close that’s so mesmerising, but Sam Chirnside is all over it. The Melbourne and New York-based artist works predominantly with oil paints to create strangely beautiful distortions, which work best when overlaid with a band logo to create album artwork, or cut out in geometric shapes. His works resemble planetary compositions straight out of a senior school physics textbook or a happy spillage in an art classroom, and we can’t get enough of them.