• Things_big

    Things

  • 1

    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

  • 3

    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

  • 6

    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

  • 5

    Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks

  • B1

    B Or Something

  • B2

    B Or Something

  • B3

    B Or Something

  • Gethin1

    Kepler-11

  • Gethine

    Kepler-11

  • Kyle

    Kyle Platts

  • Kyle2

    Kyle Platts

  • Kyle3

    Kyle Platts

  • Kyle4

    Kyle Platts

  • Pulled

    Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing

  • Pulled2

    Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing

  • Pulled3

    Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing

  • Pulled4

    Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing

Graphic Design

Things

Posted by Bryony Quinn,

An excellent hoard this week! Many thanks as per always to the sender inners, in particular to this week’s contributors: Mike Perry for his new book Pulled; Sam Barton for the B issue of Or Something; Kyle Platts for the ace zine called Kyle Platts; Gethin Wyn Jones for a colour landscape; lastly, Martin Fengel for the name of the book I can neither understand nor spell but is truly great!

Pulled: A Catalog of Screen Printing Mike Perry

A rather nicely put together comp guide to printing with screens. Mike Perry has leant some his tangible quality to a subject that we’re not unfamiliar with, but Pulled is handled with particular charm and has an ace host of artists and illustrators who, as the new generation of screen printers, says more about the process and the potential for manipulation by an artist in a work by work context.
www.mikeperrystudio.com
www.papress.com

Zine Kyle Platts

Nothing remotely ordinary about Kyle’s illustrations – there’s the ability with line and likeness that’s pretty compelling, lot’s going on in a mental -great sort of way. He’s also zombie happy and has a strange fondness for extending eyeballs which is OK by me.
www.megaskull.blogspot.com

B Or Something Sam Barton

Better then Sesame Street, Or Something bring us a letter per issue on which the contributors write lyrical. In this issue, B is for benefits, Brian Blessed and bus chats, amongst other things. Full of self-confessed “aggrandisement” (new word for me!), this “encyclopaedia for obstinate ideas” holds its own by being really, very interesting and broad. One article also addresses a rather interesting phenomena of the “unintentional mishap strip”, when revealing your belly whilst extricating yourself from a jumper.
www.orsomethingorsomething.co.uk

Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks Martin Fengel, photography and illustrations

Very much about the images and design for me here. Occasional words jump out (as happened in a depressing GCSE sometime ago) but with little impact. What I do know is this, Martin has managed to spot the a tangerine in a cello case and an arm disappearing down a horn, a high heel on a pedal and the tails of a coat parting around a back rest. It’s wonderfully abstract and totally human – there is life here yet it’s a program catalogue.
www.martinfengel.com
www.br-online.de

Kepler-11 Gethin Wyn Jones

A register perfect selection of colours form basic geometric forms that create an incredible landscapes of depth, all this from a humble screen print. Beautifully simple to make eyes at but this a great example of Gethin’s technical and aesthetic ability to play with a “new way to study the interaction of colour instead of invoking perspective”.
www.gethinjones.com

Portrait9

Posted by Bryony Quinn

Bryony was It’s Nice That’s first ever intern and worked her way up to assistant online editor before moving on to pursue other interests in the summer of 2012.

Most Recent: Art View Archive

  1. Sanda_anderlon_at_the_beach_itsnicethat_list

    Like Hieronymus Bosch for the digital age, Croatia-based Sanda Anderlon’s monumental collages are fantastically detailed and intricate. Created on her computer by painstakingly editing thousands of images she’s found online, Sanda Anderlon has a knack for capturing the smaller moments on a large scale.

  2. One-more-time_-2015_-by-cornelia-parker-ra-for-terrace-wires-itsnicethat-list

    The term “public art” often elicits a few groans from art critics, but when you consider London’s key public art spaces – the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, the Serpentine Gallery, and Tate Modern’s Turbine Hall – it’s difficult to overlook the impact sculptures and installation can have in public environments where they reach millions of people each year.

  3. List-hanna-tuulikki-away-with-the-birds-its-nice-that-

    Few art projects merge feminism, singing, birds and the ecosystems of the Hebrides. Indeed, aside from Hanna Tuulikki’s Away with the Birds, we can’t think of another. The piece, made with arts organisation The Space, is a vocal score written for an all-female ensemble that takes inspiration from the landscape of the Hebrides to create a musical composition that mimics birdsong. This was initially performed on the island of Canna back in August last year, and arts organisation The Space has now commissioned artist Hanna to create a digital version for online audiences, launching this summer to continue the artist’s explosations of womanhood, nature and the online space as an environment in its own right. We had a chat with Hanna to find out more.

  4. List-kerry-james-marshall_-plunge_-1992.

    There’s a raw, energetic feel to the work of Kerry James Marshall – it’s all bold brushstrokes and bright colours that can’t help but channel a sense of movement and action. The Alabama-born artist now lives in Chicago, and manages to get that raw, outsider art feel combined with a rigorous eye for colour and composition. The works that have particularly pulled us in are the ones that capture their subject in a moment of repose or rapture, whether quietly sunning themselves, looking in the mirror or diving into a pool. They’re the unposed moments where people are truly themselves, and Kerry’s brushes articulate them beautifully.

  5. Danielrozin-pompommirror-itsnicethat-list

    There are a lot of artists doing interesting things with digital but for me the most engaging are those who explore the points at which human and computers come together to create something interactive – such as the Random International collective (of Rain Room fame) and Daniel Rozin. The latter, a New York-based artist, educator and developer, has just opened a new show at the bitforms gallery which includes one of the most striking interactive projects we’ve come across for ages.

  6. Universaleverything-sydneyoperahouse-itsnicethat-list

    It may be my former life as a hack but there’s something about the word “biggest” that always piques my interest. That said, ambition only gets you so far and you can’t sacrifice skill or style in a headlong rush for scale. With Universal Everything though, you needn’t worry. On Friday the studio created its largest projection to date, lighting up the iconic sails of the Sydney Opera House with hand-drawn animations from 22 of the world’s best creatives. Every year the landmark commissions an artist to work on its curves and Matt Pyke and his team jumped at the chance to take on an opportunity that “epitomises everything we strive for.”

  7. Linus_bill_adrien_horni_ny_karg_catalogue_2014_it's_nice_that_list

    Swiss art duo Linus Bill and Adrien Horni’s ongoing collaboration has produced a great body of irreverent, experimental work. They first joined forces in 2011 when they were invited to produce the artistic supplement of the Swiss Art Directors Club advertising awards. Controversially, they turned the notion of award-winning design it on its head by producing a Xeroxed, deconstructed version celebrating the refused entries. This kind of do-it-yourself subversion has been the undercurrent running through everything the two image-makers (and breakers) have done since.

  8. Michaelcraig-martin-onbeinganartist-istnicethat-list

    In some circumstances, calling a book On Being An Artist would seem pretentious and pompous, but if anyone knows about being an artist, it’s Michael Craig-Martin. Over his extraordinary career he has studied with Chuck Close and Richard Serra, met the likes of Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, John Cage and Charles Saatchi, had work shown at Tate Modern, the Pompidou Centre and MoMA, and taught some of the YBAs’ leading lights including Damien Hirst and Sarah Lucas.

  9. Ricco_maresca_mexican_pulp_art_its_nice_that_list_2

    Ballsy, bizarre and a little bit racy, these Mexican pulp fiction book covers are fantastic fun and epitomise our need for a bit of weird naughtiness. The kitsch-factor is overwhelming as scantily clad women run away in terror, a man in purple spandex is surrounded by adoring cats and giant robots menacingly pick up shiny red cars.

    As part of an exhibition at New York gallery Ricco Maresca held earlier this year, the collection is a celebration of pulp paperbacks released in Mexico during the 60s and 70s. Many of the artists remain unidentified which is a shame as some of these are absolute gems. Without book titles, there’s no context for the artwork and we’re left with the ordinary and extraordinary crashing into each other in glorious fashion. According to Ricco Maresca, there’s a key difference between Mexican pulp art and the American pulp art coming out at the same time. As well as the drama and sauciness, much of Mexican pulp art prominently featured violence, sci-fi, psychedelia, and crime, making it all the more outrageous.

  10. Yayoi-kusama-itsnicethat-list

    Yayoi Kusama is one of few artists who is seems to be without comparison. Her new exhibition, Give Me Love takes place at New York’s David Zwirner gallery, and features a collection of her enormous brightly coloured canvases. Their sunny dispositions are undercut with titles which reveal a more disquieting undertone for example I Who Cry in the Flowering Season, or I Am Dying Now There the Death Is. In another room a series of her bulging Pumpkin sculptures, reminiscent of decaying fruit in spite of their metallic sheen and polka dot finish, reinforces the juxtaposition of the joyous and the sinister.

  11. Brest_history_and_chips_it's_nice_that_list

    Imagine a John Stezaker collage let loose in the kitchen and you’ve got the History and Chips series from Brest Brest Brest. With a portfolio that includes a poster of Elvis Presley’s face emerging from a melting ice cream, the graphic design studio based in the south of France couldn’t fail to pique our interest. For their playful History and Chips collages, Rémy Poncet and Arnaud Jarsaillon have raided the fridge and dressed up classic movie stills and vintage portraits with everything from smoked salmon and mustard, to ham and pineapple. A testament to the fact that food makes everything better, these old pictures are given a new lease of life thanks to a little bubblegum and a wry sense of humour.

  12. Olafur_eliasson_the_weather_project_it's_nice_that

    This week the most visited modern and contemporary art museum in the world celebrates its 15 year anniversary. After its transformation from derelict power station to beloved beacon of British culture, Tate Modern has defined a generation and helped open art to the everyman. Here, we look at some of the top moments over the last decade and a half at Britain’s leading arts institution.

  13. Kings-cross-pond-ooze-architects-its-nice-that-list

    I’ve slid down an art installation before thanks to Carsten Höller, and I’ve frolicked about in a room full of balloons thanks to Martin Creed, but never before had I literally swum in art until this morning. Bright and early, there I was shivering in art, thanks to a bathing pond art installation in a building site in London’s King’s Cross. The piece, formally known as Of Soil and Water: the King’s Cross Pond Club , was created by Ooze Architects (Eva Pfannes and Sylvain Hartenberg) and artist Marjetica Potrč, and takes the form of a natural, chemical-free pool, complete with plants and bushes. And who knows what else – I didn’t dare think what one day could be lurking in there after the maggoty old python Hampstead Heath ponds story of a few years back.