Illustrator Antoine Cossé talks about the highs and lows of creating comic books

Date
23 May 2017
Reading Time
2 minute read

Paris-born illustrator and cartoonist Antoine Cossé uses a mix of ink, watercolour, markers and pencil to create his delicate, fine line drawings. “My influences started with Herge, Crumb, then Chris Ware,” Antoine says. “I like reading a lot too. I also look at photography, cinema and architecture – I pick a lot from dreams too.”

Over the last few years Antoine has created several, beautifully detailed comic books including Harold, Nwai, Mutiny Bay and Palace 0 with Breakdown Press. The narratives vary from a broken-hearted man taking out his pain on his modernist house in Nwai, to more complex, historically-informed stories taking place in 1519 with Mutiny Bay. “A longer book is a lot more work. You need a routine and discipline. I find that comics, whatever their length, are a lot to do with rhythm,” explains Antoine. “It can be very exciting and fun with short stories. When you work on a longer book, you need to stretch this rhythm a lot more, and it’s challenging. There is also a lot more editing, a lot more research. You need to keep yourself interested. It’s very rewarding but very hard.”

To break up lengthier projects, the illustrator also works on a lot of commercial and editorial briefs for clients including The New York Times, Unicef and The Guardian. Antoine enjoys not working to a narrative, instead depicting one moment, story or idea. “It’s nice to get a break from working in comics. It’s a different exercise. Somehow there is a lot less pressure to it,” he says.

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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Antoine Cossé

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About the Author

Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca became staff writer at It’s Nice That in March 2016 before leaving the company at the end of 2017. Before joining the company full time she worked with us on a freelance basis many times, as well as stints at Macmillan Publishers, D&AD, Dazed and frieze.

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