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Regulars / Things

Care Bears on fire, Letraset and upside down headlines: it’s February Things!

As always, you lovely lot absolutely spoiled us throughout February. As the UK seemed to get colder and colder, the deliveries arriving at our door not only warmed our hearts but fuelled our (worrying) obsession for really satisfying printed matter. This month’s selection is a testament to that with zines, postcards, publications and books ranging in size and subject matter. Check out February’s Things below for a helping of care bears on fire and fluorescent, DIY zines.

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Nadine Kolodziey

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Nadine Kolodziey

Nadine Kolodziey

Kicking off this month’s Things is this set of postcards from illustrator Nadine Kolodziey. Nadine is an illustrator we’ve featured a couple of times here on It’s Nice That. Based in both Frankfurt and Berlin, her colourful work has earned her a client list including the likes of Google, Youtube, Die Zeit and Wallpaper* Magazine. Although previously featuring clashing fluorescent colours, Nadine’s recent palette has shifted towards more primary reds, yellows and blues. Despite this, her characters remain as distinctive with their long noses and, often, lack of any other facial features.

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Own Fan Club, Issue One

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Own Fan Club, Issue One

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Own Fan Club, Issue One

Own Fan Club, Issue One

Own is a London-based lifestyle brand with a “satirical view on football and the culture that surrounds it.” With a clear DIY-aesthetic, its inspired by the post-punk scene of the 1980s and football fanzines. Own produces its own fanzine, which it was kind enough to send our way, as well as clothing exploring the highs and lows of being a supporter of the modern game. Printed in black and white and on fluorescent yellow paper, Own Fan Club’s visuals are suitably “thrown together” to present a humorous and tongue-in-cheek depiction of the experience of being a fan.

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Book of Palms Volume Two

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Book of Palms Volume Two

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Book of Palms Volume Two

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Book of Palms Volume Two, Postcard by Franz Lang

Book of Palms, Volume Two

With each issue focussing on a specific region, Book of Palms is an annual magazine that initiates dialogue around art, design and culture. Where volume one focussed its attention on California, it’s the resorts, food, drink and design of The Caribbean that takes centre stage in volume two. Featuring a holographic hardback cover, Book of Palms volume two also includes a postcard by illustrator Franz Lang.

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Elliot Stokes: Weird Science

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Elliot Stokes: Weird Science

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Elliot Stokes: Weird Science

Elliot Stokes: Weird Science

This charming collection of line drawings was sent to us by illustrator Elliot Stokes. Printed in landscape form, the zine presents a series of illustrations, each depicting a confusing scenario plucked from the real world. On one page, a straw appears to split in half when it hits the water in its bottle and on another, a man appears to emit waves of some sort, after fashioning a bill made from Pringles.

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The Territories: Season One, On Land

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The Territories: Season One, On Land

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The Territories: Season One, On Land

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The Territories: Season One, On Land

The Territories: Season One, On Land

The Territories is a small publishing lab looking for stories in the antipodean landscapes, driven by a “deep curiosity about the natural and cultural histories of this country, how these physical and psychological geographies are connected.” The lab was created by Honeymoon Studio upon completing a series of projects delving into Australian history, after which, they realised that almost every aspect of the country’s culture and identity are connected to its unique landscape. The first project to be released by The Territories is On Land, a series of research publications featuring stories from Australian DIY Utopias. Printed using Risograph, each issue features black and white images and one other colour throughout, accompanied by a short text explaining each fascinating story.

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This Way Up, Issue One

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This Way Up, Issue One

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This Way Up, Issue One

This Way Up, Issue One

With an extremely telling design, the first issue of This Way Up focusses on the theme of love and happiness. In his opening letter, editor Adam Hunt describes the publication as “a creative hunger and lifestyle magazine, which explores the curiosity, desire and fulfilment of self-initiated projects in creative culture.” With a mixture of more established and lesser-known names, This Way Up’s first issue features a total of 22 contributors, its shifting and rotating design expressing the pure joy these projects bring their creators.

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Filippo Fontana: Magnum

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Filippo Fontana: Magnum

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Filippo Fontana: Magnum

Filippo Fontana: Magnum

Featuring illustrations by Filippo Fontana and co-written alongside Lorenzo Louis Pradelli, Magnum is a comic book inspired by the “contemporary figure of the ‘new rich’ in society.” Throughout the jam-packed colourful panels, the story follows three characters who each represent an extreme aspect of human behaviour, particularly in regards to our relationship to money. Despite its flashy gold colour and amicable colour palette, Magnum is dripping with dark humour, turning the humble comic into a chance for human reflection.

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Brian W Ferry: The Deepest Lake

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Brian W Ferry: The Deepest Lake

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Brian W Ferry: The Deepest Lake

Brian W Ferry: The Deepest Lake

The next instalment in this month’s Things is from New York-based photographer Brian W Ferry. The Deepest Lake features a total of 50 photographs, taken by Brian whilst exploring the Srinagar area of Kashmir in India. Combining both landscapes and portraits, the images throughout the publication are beautiful in both their content and mood. As Kashmir has been considered a mystical paradise on earth for centuries, Brian’s soft and ambient photos are a fitting portrayal of the area and its people.

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Moodboard Zine, Issue Two

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Moodboard Zine, Issue Two

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Moodboard Zine, Issue Two

Moodboard Zine, Issue Two

The image of a care bear on fire is not the easiest to skip past, so when the second issue of Moodboard zine arrived at our door we definitely wanted to find out more. Moodboard is the brainchild of Jeanie Annan-Lewis and Hannah Elwell (and designed by Studio Opposite) and is a collection of images for a millennial age. “At Moodboard, we don’t follow fashion but interact with it, encouraging creativity to embody trends and originate your own,” reads the zine’s website. With a further two covers available, issue two asked its contributors to: “Tell us your teenage dream. Tell us your favourite nightmare.”

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Letraset: The DIY Typography Revolution

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Letraset: The DIY Typography Revolution

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Letraset: The DIY Typography Revolution

Letraset: The DIY Typography Revolution

Rounding off this month’s top picks is this book bound to get any typography fan hot under the collar. The book tells the story of Letraset, “from its early days as a difficult-to-use wet system, to its glory years as the first truly democratic alternative to professional typesetting,” and has been four years in the making. With an introduction by Malcolm Garrett and interviews with the likes of Mr Bingo and Erik Brandt, as well as large images providing a comprehensive history, the book is indulgent for any fan of the rubdown lettering system.