Date
30 July 2016
Reading Time
5 minute read
Tags

Submit Saturdays: eggs, gifs and monochromatic illustration from Illustrator Jocelyn Tsaih

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Date
30 July 2016
Reading Time
5 minute read

Share

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Welcome to Submit Saturdays, a year long series of articles in partnership with Squarespace. Be it a professional work website, a shop, a social enterprise or a site that hosts a personal project, Submit Saturdays will showcase the work of creatives around the world who use the online platform Squarespace. This is a great new opportunity to share your projects and ideas with our readers.

New York-based illustrator Jocelyn Tsaih was born in Taipei and grew up in Shanghai. Her largely monochromatic work depicts curious looking human forms that are at once recognisable and alien. Jocelyn has had her work published by the likes of California Sunday Magazine and her client list includes WeWork, Nickelodeon and Hearst Digital Media.

What was your route to becoming an illustrator? Where did you study?

Growing up, I always had creative hobbies and the support of my parents to pursue them, but I never planned on creating a career out of them. It wasn’t until I started attending pre-college programmes that I took my interests seriously. I explored a few different routes to figure out what I wanted to study, which included fine arts, advertising, and interior design, but when it came time to decide, I went with graphic design at School of Visual Arts in New York. I didn’t know what graphic design really meant, but after observing other people’s work, it seemed that design was a pretty open concept with many possibilities.

During my four years at SVA, I started to realise that what I enjoyed the most was creating image-based work or combining illustration with design. I started veering even more towards illustration especially after taking a motion graphics class. I learned frame by frame animation in this class and really enjoyed the drawing process. It seems a bit backwards, but design brought me to motion graphics, motion graphics brought me to animation, and animation brought me to illustration, which is mostly what I do now.

What is the most important thing you have learned in your career to date?

One important thing I’ve learned is when to say yes or no. Sometimes I really want to say yes to every single project that I encounter, but there are so many factors to be considered. I’ve come to really value the projects that challenge me, allow me to have freedom, and push my work in the direction I’m hoping for it to go in.

A lot of your work is monochromatic – what d