Dr-me-article

Work / Illustration

Ten of our favourite collage artists on Instagram

We’ve been noticing that Instagram has been jam-packed with superb collage work lately, not to mention a few very weird and rather rude found image projects to boot. To celebrate this cut ’n paste proliferation, we’re rounding up what we feel to be the best or oddest collage works on our Instagram feeds.

Rosanna Webster

www.instagram.com/rosannawebster

Cleaner stuff here from Rosanna Webster, who uses collage to work with fashion magazines like Vogue. Her pieces are slick and pattern-focussed, and demonstrate a highly creative and unusual approach to fashion editorials.



DR:ME

www.instagram.com/drme_studio

If anyone knows a thing or two about collage, it’s the lads at DR:ME: heck, they created one a day for an entire year. They’re currently creating an ongoing series called No Bombing, which mixes imagery from swimming pools and nuclear disasters to glorious effect.



Ben Branagan

www.instagram.com/benbranagan

We’re long-time admirers of artist and designer Ben Branagan’s work, but among our fav of his creations is a brilliant and oddly serene series of collage works that utilise 1980s fitness book Arnold’s Bodybuilding for Men.

A photo posted by Ben Branagan (@benbranagan) on


New work and new site up at www.benbranagan.co.uk

A photo posted by Ben Branagan (@benbranagan) on


Jon Burgerman

www.instagram.com/jonburgerman

When he’s not bust making bright, poppy illustrations and massive murals, Jon Burgerman can be found hanging out with his famous pals: here he is chilling out with Snoop, and helping Kim K get ready. He’s even snuck his way into Taylor Swift’s #squad, the cheeky devil.



Jesse Treece

www.instagram.com/jessetreececollage

Seattle-based Jesse creates hand-made collage that uses a recurring motif of children against dystopian backdrops. They’re very well done, and we commend his analogue approach.

Untitled hand-cut collage from 2012

A photo posted by Jesse Treece (@jessetreececollage) on


"Race for the prize" hand-cut collage from 2011

A photo posted by Jesse Treece (@jessetreececollage) on


Shay Colley

www.instagram.com/shay_colley

Shay’s latest collage work is based around an unusual approach to portraiture, taking what look to be old school photographers, framing them, and photocopying them until the facial features are barely recognisable.

A photo posted by Shay Colley (@shay_colley) on


#*

A photo posted by Shay Colley (@shay_colley) on


Joe Cruz

www.instagram.com/jcruz_art

Joe Cruz works up images using bright pastels, taking found imagery and re-appropriating it for both personal work and projects for clients including The Sunday Times Magazine.



Kalen Holloman

www.instagram.com/kalen_hollomon

This gem of an Insta was brought to our attention by the gem of a creative that is INT Works’ Carol Bergin. “Kalen takes the piss out of fashion advertisements and then had a show at Colette, hmmm!”, she told us. Hmmm indeed, but boy is this work great, making subtle changes to fashion imagery to make them hilarious, feminist or both.



Patrick Waugh

www.instagram.com/patrickwaugh

Last but certainly not least, here’s Patrick Waugh, one of the brains behind the brilliant Boyo studio. His work also often uses fashion imagery, too, but elsewhere he uses a charming collaged approach to comment on current affairs.

✂️ #sundaypaper #muhammadali #cassiusclay #theobserver #collage

A photo posted by Patrick Waugh (@patrickwaugh) on


BOYO ✂️ #collage

A photo posted by Patrick Waugh (@patrickwaugh) on


Scientwehst

www.instagram.com/scientwehst

If you like your collages rude, your architecture pornographic and your lady bits on show, then get following scientwehst sharpish. Her work is very cheeky indeed, featuring a fair bit of architectural penetration and a lot of sass. Naturally, we love it.


Step into my office

A photo posted by ur biggest headache (@scientwehst) on


when you're home and you can finally blow off some steam 

A photo posted by ur biggest headache (@scientwehst) on