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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger (detail)

Work / Graphic Design

New Anthony Burrill and Ewoudt Boonstra posters use innocent victims to lampoon US gun laws

We’re well-acquainted with the brilliant woodblock posters that Anthony Burrill has made his bread and butter, so when he got in touch to share a new project he’s been working on we were happily expecting more of the same. On the contrary, his new project with Banana & Associates is a bold, provocative and political project, executed with all of Anthony’s trademark boldness and thinly-veiled wit. Pleasantly surprised does not cover it.

Innocent Targets, made in collaboration with Mr Boonstra, (Ewoudt Boonstra) is a series of shooting range posters depicting archetypal examples of the innocent victims killed by gun-related crimes in the USA each year. Anthony explains: “There are an estimated 18,000 shooting ranges operating in America today. Many of these sell custom targets featuring thugs, terrorists, aliens and zombies. The painfully ironic truth is that the real targets of gun violence aren’t these fictional ‘bad guys’ but rather our real-life friends, neighbours, co-workers and children.”

The quotes included on each of the posters remind viewers of the sheer absurdity of America’s gun crime situation, with all proceeds from the series – which can be purchased here – going to the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence. It seems that Anthony has happened on an incredibly worthwhile cause to which he can turn his hand.

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger

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Anthony Burrill: Innocent Targets, photograph by Robbie Augspurger