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Pantone: Metallics

Sponsored / Design

Pantone launches new Metallics range for print and packaging design

From packaging that shimmers on the shelf to dazzling magazine covers that catch the eye on newsstand, products using metallic colours can be found everywhere. Designers turn to these shades to add a bit of luxury, a deeper dimension or a feeling of dynamism to a product, publication or piece of signage. We’ve got good news for those designers – they now have even more tools in their armoury.

Pantone, the masters of all things colour, has just launched its new Metallics for graphic and packaging design. The collection combines its prior offering with the addition of 54 new colours and a new rose gold base ink, totalling 655 trend-relevant metallic hues.

This isn’t the first time Pantone has released a selection of metallic colours – the brand launched its original metallics in 2006 and then a set of Premium ones in 2010. But now Pantone is combining all of these into one robust collection featuring 655 metallic shades that are globally available off-the-shelf. “In the absence of this, many designers have turned to foil stamping, cold foil or mylar which are typically more expensive and often provide less colour options, and at a greater cost than printing with metallic inks,” says Michele Nicholson, product manager of Graphics at Pantone.

According to Michele, at Pantone, the development of new colours “revolves around relentless trend forecasting and analysis”, pointing out that colour trends are impacted by “global social, economic, cultural and industrial influences”. In fact, these 54 new shades being launched were inspired by the Pantone Metallic Shimmers, which were recently added to the Pantone Fashion, Home and Interiors System. For designers and suppliers working across various media and materials, this alignment will help ensure that print and packaging colours can be more easily matched to products including textiles, plastics and paint.

Michele goes on: “The trend for metallics in packaging, branding, signage and graphic design in general has increased and continues to have a steady incline – especially in the luxury packaging market.” This is certainly noticeable when you look at the packaging being created for premium brands around the world. From chocolate makers such as Harlow and Finn to spirits brands to fashion label Seraphine (see images), nothing quite adds a touch of class to a box or bottle like a splash of lustrous gold or rich bronze.

This might not feel all that new (after all, whisky bottles have long shown their luxury credentials through rich copper colours), but what is perhaps more novel is the trend for publications to use metallics. We at It’s Nice That have, over the course of the past year alone, seen everything from a magazine with a shimmering gold cover to an art book printed in gleaming silver ink on black matte paper to a company report printed throughout in platinum ink. Such is the versatility of metallics that these uses are all possible.

If you want to learn more or to get started using Pantone’s vast collection of metallics, pick up the Metallics Guide and Chips Book for graphic and packaging design. New guides also available within Pantone’s product bundles include the Reference Library, Portable Guide Studio, Solid Guide Set, and Master Collection.

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