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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

Work / Art

Tina Schwizgebel-Wang’s etchings are filled with detailed scenes of everyday life

Since the age of nine, Tina Schwizgebel-Wang has kept a diary. In it, she has continued to produce a drawing a day. If this, plus the fact that she is the granddaughter of the acclaimed painter Wang Maigon, doesn’t signal some kind of artistic destiny, then what does?

Today, Tina is a multidisciplinary artist, flitting across disciplines and working across drawing, ink work, fashion design, ceramics and even tattoo art. She has won numerous prizes for her drawing, including first prize at the Fumetto International Festival two years running, and has exhibited her work in Geneva at the Galerie Papiers Gras and at the Pinakothek in Munich. What really caught our eye, though, were Tina’s etchings.

Filled with detailed scenes and meticulous depictions of everyday life, these works are charming in a quiet, gentle way. “I get my inspiration during my travels and from what’s around me,” she tells It’s Nice That. “Then, I start to do some sketches. When I’m in the studio, I already know which drawing I want to turn into an etching.”

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

The etching method dates back to Germany in the late Middle Ages. Although it is still widely used today, some might view this method of printmaking as an outmoded and dying art form. But Tina disagrees: “I think its hour of glory will come back soon,” she says. “It has just been put aside for a little while in recent years. I keep meeting more and more artists who are fascinated by this technique.”

Tina’s creative process evolves around a sketch or a piece of photography that has “lots of details” – something along the lines of a train station or a mountainous landscape. “With the etching process, you can be super precise and go deeper in the piece,” she says. Her work is therefore impressively complex and packed with intricate scenes. Plus, as an added bonus, her pieces are playing their small part in keeping the craft of etching alive.

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang

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Tina Schwizgebel-Wang