Golden Cosmos illustrates the history of Locomotives for Nobrow

Date
8 September 2016
Reading Time
1 minute read

Berlin-based Golden Cosmos is the studio name of illustrators Daniel Dolz and Doris Freigofas, who have worked together since 2010. Locomotion: A History of Locomotives is a new concertina book by the pair that unfolds to reveal a pictorial evolution of rail transport from steam engines to the 21st Century. Across 20 panels, the imagery tells the story of key moments in rail history including the first steam-powered carriage designed by Nicolas J. Cugnot, The Tay Bridge Disaster in 1879 and the opening of the Channel Tunnel.

Published by Nobrow, the 139cm panorama shifts between time, continents and individual stories to create a constantly shifting single image that is both complex and lively. The illustrators deftly draw your attention to subplots that are packed with character and readily identifiable motifs that ensure the book retains a strong narrative.

“The history of trains is really diverse and we had fun going through the times, always being excited what was to come next,” say Daniel and Doris. “The early beginnings of trains with the first steam machines and all the adventurous experiments like the race Rainhill Trials were particularly fun to draw, especially visualising the sounds, the smell but also the grace of the heavy monstrous locomotives.”

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion sketch

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Golden Cosmos: Locomotion sketch

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About the Author

Owen Pritchard

Owen joined It’s Nice That as Editor in November of 2015 leading and overseeing all editorial content across online, print and the events programme, before leaving in early 2018.

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