20th-Century artist Hiroshi Yoshida's serene woodblock prints of famous landmarks

Date
31 January 2017
Reading Time
1 minute read

Hiroshi Yoshida was a 20th Century Japanese painter and woodblock printer. He is known for his landscape prints that offer an exotic interpretation of the world. The artist was a keen traveller and visited Europe, North America and Asia, and along the way he created numerous prints of non-Japanese subjects done in traditional Japanese woodblock style. In his works of landmarks such as the Taj Mahal, the Grand Canyon and the Swiss Alps, they take on a serene, graphic beauty cloaked in a veil of pastel hues.

Hiroshi was considered part of the shin hanga or “new print” movement, a creative process where the artist, carver, printer and publisher engaged in a division of labour. Yet after 1925, he shed those constraints and participated in each stage of printmaking himself, known as sosaku hanga.

His works are currently on show at Ronin Gallery in New York, which specialises in Japanese and east Asian contemporary art. The show, Hiroshi Yoshida: Worldly Visions, demonstrates Hiroshi’s eye for colour, and ability to seemingly transport viewers to another world where a rose-tint of adventure inhabits each piece. His composition skills and minute detail in each print is fascinating, and it’s no surprise the artist often used as many as 30 cherry wood blocks to create each work.

Hiroshi Yoshida: Worldly Visions is on now at the Ronin Gallery, New York until 25 February 2017.

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Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

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Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

Above

Hiroshi Yoshida. Images courtesy of Ronin Gallery

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About the Author

Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca became staff writer at It’s Nice That in March 2016 before leaving the company at the end of 2017. Before joining the company full time she worked with us on a freelance basis many times, as well as stints at Macmillan Publishers, D&AD, Dazed and frieze.

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