Odiseo's unlucky 13th issue explores how betrayal is rife in today's political climate

Date
5 February 2019
Reading Time
3 minute read

“As with most of the previous issues, it all happened by chance,” says Emmy Koski, editor-in-chief of Odiseo, referring to the magazine’s latest issue. “This one basically started with something as mind-blowing as a Google search about how 13 became the unlucky number. The superstition is born from the Biblical tale, the last supper,” she continues. “Apparently, Judas, the betrayer, was the 13th to sit down at the table.”

A direct result of Emmy’s search, Issue 13 is titled The Last Supper. It explores the concept of treachery through the kind of beautiful imagery which has become synonymous with the publication, focusing in on how acts of betrayal, in many ways, define the world we live in.

“Treachery has many faces. This is usually something we aim for with every issue – to have a theme that can be interpreted in many ways,” Emmy tells us. The Last Supper therefore features a broad range of contributions, everything from “deceptive mysticism trending on the internet to post-truth, manipulation, good and evil, self-betrayal and violation of consent”.

In one feature, Emmy chats to poet and writer Ashley D’Arcy about the rising popularity of zodiac signs and horoscopes as well as spell casting and witchcraft on social media. Cecilia Azcarate, on the other hand, was invited to reframe the Kiss of Judas through classic art. “The best part of the process is to understand how the creatives we curate can work around the theme without anyone actually reaching the same outcome, not even close,” explains Emmy. “I always have a certain idea of what I would like to get out of the brief, but at the same time, I am always amazed by the diversity.”

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Left

Alexandra Von Fuerst in collaboration with artist Yasmin Benabdelkrim: Odiseo, The Last Supper

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Alexandra Von Fuerst: Odiseo, The Last Supper

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Alexandra Von Fuerst: Odiseo, The Last Supper

The final photographer Emmy worked with was Alexandra Von Fuerst and it’s this shoot that ended up being used on the issue’s cover. “Alexandra has a very interesting understanding of beauty and touches exactly that crucial point between fashion, art and eroticism that is Odiseo,” she says. Alexandra’s shoot took the concept of betrayal and applied it in an introspective manner, exploring how it lies in our “own truth” and the search for who we are. The shoot features several portraits, as well as a series of somewhat-unnerving still life images made in collaboration with artist Yasmin Benabdelkrim.

“The cover could mean many things,” Emmy remarks. “For me, it is a representation of Judas. Disguised, discomforted, veiled, ​she​ closes her eyes. The armadillo might stand for the protection of our inner selves, but it also relates to self-absorption and arrogance. Yellow is a sign of deceit and cowardice and is often the colour Judas is dressed in.”

Ultimately, The Last Supper takes the concept of treachery and makes astute observations about today’s political climate. In a world where corruption and slander are commonplace, betrayal on all levels is rife. “The official year of ‘disappointed but not surprised’ is upon us,” Odiseo points out, “and yet, these deceptions have proven to be somewhat decisive, for better and for worse.”

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Alexandra Von Fuerst: Odiseo, The Last Supper

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Alexandra Von Fuerst in collaboration with artist Yasmin Benabdelkrim: Odiseo, The Last Supper

Above

Alexandra Von Fuerst in collaboration with artist Yasmin Benabdelkrim: Odiseo, The Last Supper

Above

Odiseo, The Last Supper

Above

Odiseo, The Last Supper

Above

Odiseo, The Last Supper

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Odiseo, The Last Supper

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About the Author

Ruby Boddington

Ruby joined the It’s Nice That team as an editorial assistant in September 2017 after graduating from the Graphic Communication Design course at Central Saint Martins. In April 2018, she became a staff writer and in August 2019, she was made associate editor. Get in contact with Ruby about ideas you may have for long-form stories on the site.

rbd@itsnicethat.com

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