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Seba Cestaro

Work / Illustration

Seba Cestaro “adds eyes to everything” in his surreal 2D and 3D illustrations

“I usually add eyes to everything: people, furniture, pieces of clothes,” states illustrator Seba Cestaro on his signature aesthetic. “It has become a fundamental element of my illustrations as it gives personality to almost everything.” These exaggerated goggle-eyes have been a staple in the Buenos Aires-based illustrator’s work for some years now as seen in our post on him from last year. More recently, however, he’s been adding texture into his work which he feels “builds a much bigger impact on his audience.”

Rather than integrating illustration into a wider context of graphic design like many designers working today, Seba is doing the opposite. He uses graphic design sensibilities to inform and enhance his illustrations. For instance, he plasters his work against a wall to create the same textures that are more often associated with adverts or club flyers founded scattered around the streets.

Having been commissioned by the likes of Vice, Wired, Victory Journal and Hoheluft Mag, Seba’s style is increasingly moving towards surrealism, as opposed to the abstract forms that he’s loved since he was a child. He tells It’s Nice That, “Now I can say that my illustrations are almost ridiculous, but with more concrete figures.” Despite his illustrations becoming more surreal than ever, Seba’s use of fried egg-like eyes “make us understand what is happening around us” through their inquisitive expression.

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Seba Cestaro

Recently, Seba collaborated with animator and game developer Boris Cavusoglu on a new comic book called Now. The comic explores themes of time, capitalism, stereotypes and life goals, adopting a new aesthetic for the illustrator by merging 2D and 3D visuals together. “Basically this was an experiment for us,” says Seba on Now’s creation. “We didn’t have any idea of how it would end, but the process was super interesting and rewarding for both of me and Boris.”

The eight-week-long project marks a pointed turn in Seba’s visual development. From mainly working in digital collage, the illustrator has started to combine photographic imagery into his practice, resulting in a “new and more powerful concept.” Carrying on this inquiry into untrodden territory for Seba, he’s currently embarking on his first animated short film. Presently working on the character development and plot line, it will be a while yet before the film is ready for viewing. But whether he’ll continue to develop this interdisciplinary way of working, or stick to his crowd-pleasing signature aesthetic; we’ll have to wait and see.

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Seba Cestaro and Boris Cavusoglu: Now

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Seba Cestaro and Boris Cavusoglu: Now

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Seba Cestaro

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Seba Cestaro

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Seba Cestaro

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Seba Cestaro

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Seba Cestaro

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Seba Cestaro