Tiago Galo’s graphic editorial illustrations communicate abstract concepts

Date
6 April 2017
Reading Time
2 minute read

Portuguese illustrator Tiago Galo enjoys working on editorial briefs as it allows him to “get into other people’s minds” and interpret their ideas in his own way. “In the end I always discover something new about the universe,” Tiago explains. Having created work for The Hollywood Reporter, Financial Times and Canadian Business Magazine, it’s the time constraints in these briefs that’s most challenging for the illustrator. “Usually I never get more than a few days to work on an editorial illustration, so it’s about balancing the time with my expectations,” he says. “You really have to have a lot of self-discipline, which is something I’ve learned over the years.”

Having worked as an architect before pursuing design and illustration full time, Tiago’s style is graphic and neat, with texture and colour playing an important role in his work. “I always say the right colour palette can save even the most disastrous illustration, so I give special importance when it comes to choosing the right shades, as they play a big part in the visual stimulus you need to create that initial impact,” explains Tiago.

We featured Tiago last year and his portfolio is brimming with new work including depictions of sunbathing/burning beauties, a Buddhist man salting a cow and a little devil tucked into the pocket of denim shorts. The concepts Tiago’s tasked with communicating are often abstract, but the illustrator’s clear and uncomplicated style allows him to push the boundaries between what’s real and imagined. “I like to tell stories and create parallel realities thorough my illustrations,” says Tiago. “I’m always getting odd ideas in the most common places and everyday situations. The stories and even colours I choose help me create a particular aesthetic when someone looks at my work. It’s just like each illustration and character are a piece of a puzzle you can easily associate to that bizarre and surreal world.”

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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Tiago Galo

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About the Author

Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca became staff writer at It’s Nice That in March 2016 before leaving the company at the end of 2017. Before joining the company full time she worked with us on a freelance basis many times, as well as stints at Macmillan Publishers, D&AD, Dazed and frieze.

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