Soviet bus stops captured by worldly photographer Christopher Herwig

Date
6 June 2012
Reading Time
1 minute read

World press photographer and enthusiast of the curiously mundane Christopher Herwig struck gold when he came across the bus stops in parts of the world previously designated as part of the Soviet Union. That term conjures images of terrifying car park-like blocks and grey, intimidating statues of fists – constructions that don’t really bear any resemblance to these very odd little bus stops.

It turns out that, during the Soviet period, all designated transportation-related buildings were spared from the strict function-over-aesthetic rule, and complete creative freedom was given to the people building them, making way for murals, statues and very inventive roof structures in most stations and bus stops. Christopher Herwig’s beautiful collection shows us what is left of these structures, most of which are maintained by locals as a nod to the die-hard, bus stop creatives of the past.

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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Christopher Herwig: Soviet Bus Stops

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About the Author

Liv Siddall

Liv joined It’s Nice That as an intern in 2011 and worked across online, print and events, and was latterly Features Editor before leaving in May 2015.

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