Photography: William Miller repurposes discarded negatives to create jewel-like images

Date
3 June 2014

Recycling, upcycling and repurposing is all the rage these days and while not everyone needs an armchair made out of a bathtub, the concept of subverting an object’s original purpose is an interesting one. Take William Miller’s latest project, Surface Tension, he’s used discarded negatives from old photography projects and turned them into sculptural objects. By crushing, folding and slicing the negatives and using a flatbed scanner to photograph them, a stunning, abstract refraction is created.

We’ve been big fans of William’s for a couple of years now, featuring his Ruined Polaroids project back in 2012, which also converted discarded items into beautiful works of art. This new series is just as mesmerising with beautiful reddish brown tones, clashing wonderfully with electric blue and cerulean pigments.

I love how they look like close-ups of amazingly weird jewels, and how it’s only when we’re given an aerial of one of the negatives that it’s clear how this effect has been achieved. It’s fascinating to see someone use a material in an inventive way, playing with techniques and processes to create something far more beautiful than perhaps it could have been.

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Above

William Miller: Surface Tension

Share Article

About the Author

Rebecca Fulleylove

Rebecca became staff writer at It’s Nice That in March 2016 before leaving the company at the end of 2017. Before joining the company full time she worked with us on a freelance basis many times, as well as stints at Macmillan Publishers, D&AD, Dazed and frieze.

It's Nice That Newsletters

Fancy a bit of It's Nice That in your inbox? Sign up to our newsletters and we'll keep you in the loop with everything good going on in the creative world.