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The Economist praises the importance of curiosity for its first TV ad in a decade

One of the world’s most venerable magazines, The Economist, has launched its first television advertising campaign in a decade, and it wants viewers, and readers, to retain the kind of curiosity that seems to come naturally to children.

Founded in 1843, The Economist is, as the name suggests, one of the go-to publications for anyone out there with even the mildest hint of interest in how money shapes the planet. The magazine encourages readers to “Never Stop Questioning” — the name of the new campaign — and “brings to life the universal truth that we learn by asking why, just as The Economist has always asked provocative questions to champion progress.”

That might explain why the advert follows the life of a young girl with a particularly curious mind. From childhood to adulthood, via the quagmire that is adolescence, she’s shown to question, well, pretty much everything. “Shouldn’t we all ask why the world is the way it is,” she says, gently suggesting to the viewer that subscribing to The Economist might help them answer that one.

Produced by Proximity London, the advert is set to run on a transatlantic basis, with UK viewers able to catch it on ITV, Channel 4, and Channel 5, while our American cousins will have it served to them via CBS, NBC, Fox, and ABC.

“We have a loyal and dedicated readership that perceives great value from their relationship with The Economist and truly loves our brand,” says the publication’s chief marketing officer Mark Cripps. “Our readers never stop questioning the world around them and we believe this campaign will attract a similar audience and encourage them to learn more about The Economist.”

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The Economist/Proximity London: Never Stop Questioning